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Natural Moral Law

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Introduction

Natural Moral Law a) Clarify the key concepts of natural moral law The roots natural law can be found in the ancient Greek and Roman world. In this essay Thomas Aquinas and moral law theory will be highlighted. St Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274), was an important Christian philosopher and theologian who's ethical theory is absolutist and deontological, which means that it is focused on the ethicacy of actions. In his work, summa theologica, Aquinas described natural law as a moral code existing within the purpose of nature, created by God: 'Law is nothing else than an ordinary of reason for the common good promulgated by the one who is in charge of the community' Primary and secondary precepts Whether or not an act leads towards God depends upon whether the action fits the purpose that humans were made for. ...read more.

Middle

Real and apparent goods. Aquinas believed that human nature was essentially good, as natural law is within everyone. He maintained that humans were orientated towards the achievement of perfection and that they could never knowingly pursue evil. Sin consists of Gods intention for humans. To choose an apparent good is an error, because it isn't really good for us. E.g. an adulterer commits adultery because he believes it is good. This is an error of reason, because adultery prevents humans from being closer to what God intended. In similarity, in the example of a child watching TV rather than getting an education, the child believes that watching TV in large amounts is good, although in fact less time should be given to such things and more to learning. ...read more.

Conclusion

b) Consider how useful the application of natural moral law can be to either justice law or authority. This essay will consider how useful the application of natural moral law can be to Justice. Justice is establishing a society in which equality of liberty/freedom is promoted and provided. Hovner and Westacott (2000) say that 'any society I would like to live in must prize individual freedom, but not to the exclusion of social responsibility or of justice. Justice is fairness, equal opportunity for all'. Justice is most associated with social democracy. Justice has a notion of equality- I) Fundamental equality- there are to be no special privileges and all people are to be treated as equal. II) Social equality- III) Equal treatment for equals- People that are equal should be treated equally IV) Treat equals equally and unequally- some may need special help or punishment. Equality does not necessarily imply sameness. Shyam Bhayani Religious Studies ...read more.

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