• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Outline and evaluate the teleological argument for God's existence.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Outline and evaluate the teleological argument for God's existence The teleological argument is also known as the argument from design. It is the idea that our world and the universe surrounding it are so intricate that it could not happen by accident, it was designed. William Paley put forward perhaps the most famous version of this with the watchmaker argument. Imagine you live on a desolate desert island and one day you come across a watch. By looking at it and examining, the intricate and complicated mechanisms you would conclude that it was designed by an intelligent designer. A watch could not happen by chance. ...read more.

Middle

Back to this 'perfect watch', its not perfect. It does not automatically adjust the time when the clocks go forward. Instead it spitefully ticks away knowing that you will be late for work. Alternatively, does it remember leap years? Does it give you an apology? No because it is a mean and uncaring watch. Our world is much like this watch, its imperfect. It is rude and selfish. People are staving and we are sitting here stuffing our faces. Our amazing hands are not so amazing after all, they wear out, muscles and bones break. Surely, an intelligent designer would design us with out these faults. ...read more.

Conclusion

Where did this intelligent being come from? Why is it plausible for him to exist but not God? Surely, God could of built the parent universe Hume talks about. It does not have to be the being Hume talks about. Hume points out how little we know about universes, we have only experienced one. They could occur naturally and not require an intelligent designer. One major problem with the teleological argument is that it talks about the universe as a whole when you cannot talk about describe it using words fitting to parts of it. It is like asking a group of people how old the group is as a general. The universe is a very complicated thing. It all cannot be explained by one answer. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Existence of God section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Existence of God essays

  1. Discuss the teleological argument for the existence of God. How viable is this argument?

    (Hick, 1990) The structure of his argument is that human artefacts are products of intelligent design (purpose). His second point is that, the universe resembles these human artefacts. Therefore, the universe is (probably) a product of intelligent design (purpose), but the universe is vastly more complex and gigantic than a human artefact.

  2. Outline the Design Argument for the Existence of God

    This is therefore evidence for the existence of God. It cannot be a result of natural selection, as everyone has the ability to appreciate or dislike their surroundings equally. Things being beautiful or ugly within our surroundings are not necessary for survival, so there must have been a designer to implant these characteristics into humans.

  1. What are the main strengths and weaknesses of teleological argument for the existence of ...

    product of blind chance and nothing more is a personally unsatisfactory one due to the extraordinary nature of the universe and so whilst the Teleological Argument may not conclusively prove the existence of God it suggests that the existence of a Designer, who we know as God, is a more probable likelihood than not.

  2. Examine the design argument for the existence of God.

    This universe-maker can be called God. Consider this diagram.8 I will now rehearse the design argument as expressed by David Hume9, through Cleanthes, using analogy. Hume follows Plato's method and writes in the form of a debate between two main characters: Cleanthes and Philo. Cleanthes is used to put forward the argument; and Philo is then

  1. Explain the Ontological argument.

    Kant named these the postulates of morality. Freedom is required because we feel a certain obligation to carry out certain duty; we must have the freedom to do so. Kant argument has three main stages. He argued that if it is our unconditional duty to aim for the goal of this law: 'We should seek to further the highest good.'

  2. The Teleological Argument.

    Taylor believes that in the same way we can view the constant arrangement of the universe as having a message and a purpose. In my opinion the argument with the most evidence is regularity. This states that there is so much order in the world that there must have been a designer who set this order.

  1. Outline and Critically Evaluate the design Argument

    We cannot be ignorant and simply suggest that a stone serves no purpose just because we know not of it and have not seen it personally created. Neither can we simply conclude that pure chance allowed the cosmos to occur.

  2. A Big Bang Cosmological Argument for God's Nonexistence

    This suggests that the paths will miss each other instead of converging at a point. This in turn suggests that the present expansion phase of the universe results from a 'bounce' that terminated a prior contracting phase of the universe.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work