• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

GCSE: Hinduism

Browse by

Currently browsing by:

Meet our team of inspirational teachers

find out about the team

Get help from 80+ teachers and hundreds of thousands of student written documents

  1. Hindu Marriage

    The father then goes on to pour out a libation of sacred water symbolizing the giving away of the daughter to the bride groom. The groom is then requested by the father as a condition for offering his daughter for marriage, to promise to assist the bride in his moral duty (dharma), the earning of money (artha) and the enjoyment of sacred things in life (kama). The groom makes the promise by repeating three times that he will not fail the bride in fulfilling dharma, artha and kama.

    • Word count: 3357
  2. Attacks on religious minotirties in Bangaladesh

    2. No one shall be subject to coercion which would impair his freedom to have or to adopt a religion or belief of his choice. 3. Freedom to manifest one's religion or beliefs may be subject only to such limitations as are prescribed by law and are necessary to protect public safety, order, health, or morals or the fundamentals rights and freedom of others. 4. the parties to the present Covenant undertake to have respect for the liberty of parents and, when applicable, legal guardians to ensure the religious and moral education of their children in conformity with their own convictions.

    • Word count: 4821
  3. Describe a visit to a Hindu place of pilgrimage, explaining its importance to believers.

    There is another version of the story about the river Ganges from the Ramayana, the epic poem about Rama, tells how the holy Ganges came to earth. Initially, the Ganges flowed in heaven. King Sagara had lost sixty thousands of his sons in the hell because of the wrath of a wise man, Kapila, whom he had insulted. Sagara tried to bring down the Ganges to the earth and then to hell, to revive his sons but he couldn't succeed.

    • Word count: 5121

Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • To what extent were the builders of the Erechtheion successful in solving the problems caused by the site and position of the temple?

    "conclusion, whether the builders of the Erechtheion were successful in solving the problems caused by the site and the position. In order to do this, I will be using evidence such as illustrations, ground plans and different viewpoints of the Erechtheion. I will analysis the Erechtheion through the individual elevations. A comparison of the Erechtheion and a regular hexastyle temple will be an imperative feature when dealing with the abnormalities and potential problems of the Erechtheion. Throughout this essay"

  • Compare and contrast the iconography and mythology of at least two major Hindu deities.

    "With many people being unable to read during and around the Puranic period, the iconography became of vast importance. People relied on the pictures to tell them the stories of the gods and that is a large reason why each aspect of the icon represents something different, to tell the story of the god. For example, Vishnu's lotus he holds symbolises his purity and the fire Shiva encircles is representing the life cycle of the universe. However, this essay does not attempt to deny the importance of the scriptures, as without them, the pictures are merely pictures and not visions of spirituality. In conclusion, although this essay has looked at Vishnu and Shiva individually as separate deities, the focus must be left on them as one, for that is what they are, existing only with each other. The cycle of the universe relies on all of them, Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva, to continue for if one were to disappear, the chain of the creation, destruction and recreation of the world would be broken. "Germination creates the tree, destroys the seed and preserves the species; the joiner creates the table, destroys the tree and preserves the wood" (Larousse, 1965:211). 1"

  • To what extent were propaganda and national pride as important as religion in the design, construction and decoration of the Parthenon?

    "Conclusion I think that the answer to the title is slightly ambiguous. I believe that Pericles wanted to see his fair city become a shining monument to the people and win favour as a politician. But I think that it could be seen as cynicism of the people today that people of ancient Greece could be so dedicated to religion and chose to spend a great deal of money on so huge a project. Perhaps they wanted to show their piety and appreciation to the gods that after so many violent wars, their city was still here. So to conclude, I believe that national pride was hugely important in the building of the Parthenon, and although it seems that religion took a lower priority, it may have been just as important as national pride in the building of the Parthenon."

Marked by a teacher

This document has been marked by one of our great teachers. You can read the full teachers notes when you download the document.

Peer reviewed

This document has been reviewed by one of our specialist student essay reviewing squad. Read the full review on the document page.

Peer reviewed

This document has been reviewed by one of our specialist student document reviewing squad. Read the full review under the document preview on this page.