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Saltaire is a model village built between 1851 and 1876 by Sir Titus Salt.

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Introduction

Introduction Saltaire is a model village built between 1851 and 1876 by Sir Titus Salt. Sir Titus salt was born on 20th September 1803 at the Old Manor house. He was educated at Dame School, Morley and later at Batley Grammar School. In 1820, he left school and started work in the wool stapling business; this involved buying wool from the farmer and selling it to the manufacturer. When his parents moved to Bradford, Titus prospered in the Wool Trade. He attended wool sales all over England. In order to accommodate his workers Sir Titus Salt built the village saltaire named after the river aire. Sir Titus Salt used a limited number of architects to build saltaire. He was trying to combine the new technology of the nineteenth century to the ordered authority of the pre-industrial world. The village of saltaire is also closely related to the ideas and principles of sir Titus salt not only in the way he named the streets after his relatives and people he knew but also in his more established principles which arose from his religion, being a non confirmist Sir Titus salt was strongly opposed to drinking. This is why there are no pubs in the village of saltaire. ...read more.

Middle

On the south side of the church, is the salt mausoleum. The vault in the salt mausoleum contains the remains of sir Titus Salt, Lady Caroline Salt, Titus Salt (jnr), Katherine (daughter), Whitlam salt (son) and Mary salt (daughter). When the mausoleum was complete, he had his two children exhumed and brought to Saltaire, where they lie together. There is stillroom for another five interments. The front doors of the church and the mill face each other. The symbolism is that work and god are related-those who work hard will be rewarded in heaven. Congregnational Sunday school Salt donated �7,000 towards the �10,000 costs. The school was designed by Lockwood and Mawson, and had a main assembly room for 800, with 22 classrooms around it. Harold Salt opened the building in May 1876; Sir Titus attended but was in poor health. Sadly, the school was demolished in 1973. Victoria Road Bridge. Victoria Road Bridge crossed to Roberts Park and Coach Road. The bridge was 430 feet long, originally on stone piers, but was rebuilt in 1868 on cast iron columns. The crossing allowed access to the park and the private road beyond which lead to Titus junior's house at Milner Field, near Bingley, and Edward Salt's house at Ferniehurst, Baildon, The Bridge was demolished as unsafe in the 1950s and replaced ...read more.

Conclusion

Titus named the main street after queen Victoria. In 1861, it was called Victoria Street but by 1871, it was upgraded to Victoria road. Two streets were named after prince Albert-Albert Road And Albert terrace. The two architects, Lockwood and Mawson got a street each.11 streets were named after his children's Christian names. His wife Caroline also had a street named after her. Three streets are not family names-Fern, Daisy and Myrtle. These three were Caroline salts personal maids. There were also an additional two streets without family names- Higher Street and Lower School Street. Saltaire Club And Institute The Saltaire club and institute is located on Victoria road opposite the factory schools. It was built between 1869 and 1871 and cost �25 000. Titus Salt jnr stated that the building was to "supply the advantages of a public house, without its evil...." Thomas Milnes was commissioned to provide carved heads for the top windows. Most of them are Roman heads. The tower has Salt on its four sides and then a mystery. The two heads on the right of the door are not Roman. Above the doorway, Milnes carved the figures of Art and science and ha the official coat of arms, as salt had become a baronet in 1869. The hand in the middle of the shield indicates this. On the doors inside is the Salt motto: Quid Non Deo Juvante-everything is possible with God's help. ...read more.

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