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Shared Traits of the Christian, Islamic and Jewish Interpretations of Their Common God, and the Logical Testing of the Validity of His Existence By That Definition

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Introduction

SHARED TRAITS OF THE CHRISTIAN, ISLAMIC AND JEWISH INTERPRETATIONS OF THEIR COMMON GOD, AND THE LOGICAL TESTING OF THE VALIDITY OF HIS EXISTENCE BY THAT DEFINITION Is there a God? Well, that depends. Which god are you talking about? Zeus? Odin? Isis? Jehovah? Allah? Yahweh? The Trinity? The last four are in fact the same God, worshipped by four different groups. Jehovah and the Trinity are both worshipped by Christian sects, Allah by Muslims, and Yahweh by Jews. Each group disagrees with each other group about the particulars concerning their God, but all agree on the basics. The following is a breakdown of the definition of God which all three monotheistic (only one god exists) religions. Since these are the Big Three religions of the world, and they all look to the same God, I will try to logically deduce whether this God can indeed exist. The other three gods are by and large no longer worshipped, so I can save an analysis of their existence for another day. As for the hundreds of other gods worshipped throughout the world, there is not space enough here to consider them. ...read more.

Middle

Their existence would be pointless. Further still, God need not instill free will upon his servants. They need only be automations. They need not even be self-aware. Why would they be granted self-awareness, then? Why would they be granted the ability to disobey? Does god require some means to alleviate boredom, so he grants us an ability to be unpredictable? If God is omniscient, there is no such thing as unpredictability. Also, a perfect god would need no alleviation from boredom. Does God want his creations to entertain him with their conflicts? That again suggests a desire, and also adds maliciousness to Gods personality, which suggests a fault. A perfect being has no faults. Thus, we have disproved the first supposition in the definition of God. The being cannot be both perfect and the creator. Since we have disproved a part of the definition, the whole definition is at fault. The being described cannot exist. God cannot exist. Summary * It is impossible that a perfect God would bother with creating or interfering with the Universe. * It is impossible for God to be both perfect and creator. ...read more.

Conclusion

This is contrary to the idea of omnipotence. While he would still be vastly powerful, especially to the eyes of a human, he is not all-powerful. Gods definition has thus been whittled away even further. Again we can declare God a fictional being, or we can continue to refine the definition and attempt to save him. Sorry. Three strikes. Gods out. Summary * It is impossible for God to be omnipotent. Conclusion It is impossible for the monotheistic God worshipped by Christians, Jews and Muslims to exist. We are left with three possibilities; another god exists which we have yet to define, multiple gods (defined or undefined) exist, no gods exist. The most probable of these, if we are to follow Ockhams Razor (do not multiply entities unnecessarily / take the simplest explanation possible, but no simpler an explanation), is that there are no gods. And what of the God we have debunked? He is best described as the ultimate imaginary friend, a delusional source of security for a people who find it difficult to deal with the hardship of everyday life. Yet like the child who must relinquish his fantasy friend and face the real world in order to truly mature, so to must the human race face reality if it is to mature into a truly advanced species. ...read more.

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