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The Five Pillars Of Islam.

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Introduction

The Five Pillars Of Islam The five pillars of Islam are: faith, prayer, concern for the needy, self-purification, and the pilgrimage to Makkah. Faith: "There is no god worthy of worship except God and Muhammad is His messenger." This declaration of faith is called the Shahada, a simple formula which all the faithful pronounce. In Arabic, the first part is 'la ilaha illa Llah' - 'there is no god except God'; 'ilaha' (god) can refer to anything which we may be tempted to put in place of God - wealth, power, and things similar. Then comes 'illa Llah'- 'except God', the source of all Creation. The second part of the Shahada is 'Muhammadun rasulu'Llah'- 'Muhammad is the messenger of God.' A message of guidance has come through a man like ourselves. Prayer: Salat is the name for the compulsory prayers, which are performed five times a day, and are a direct link between the worshipper and God. ...read more.

Middle

Come to success! God is most great. God is most great. There is no god except God. The Zakat: One of the most important principles of Islam is that all things belong to God, and that wealth is therefore held by human beings in trust. The word zakat means both 'purification' and 'growth'. Our possessions are purified by setting aside a portion for those in need, and, like the pruning of plants, this cutting back balances and encourages new growth. Each year Muslim calculates his or her own zakat individually. For most purposes this involves payment each year of two and a half percent of one's capital. A religious person may also give as much as he or she pleases as sadaqa, and does so preferably in secret. Although this word can be translated as 'voluntary charity' it has a wider meaning. The Prophet (PBUH) said: 'even meeting your brother with a cheerful face is charity.' The Fast: Every year in the month of Ramadan, all Muslims fast from first light until sundown, abstaining from food, drink, and sexual relations. ...read more.

Conclusion

Although Makkah is always filled with visitors, the annual Hajj begins in the twelfth month of the Islamic year (which is lunar, not solar, so that Hajj and Ramadan fall sometimes in summer, sometimes in winter). Pilgrims wear special clothes: simple garments which strip away distinctions of class and culture, so that all stand equal before God. The rites of the Hajj, which are of Abrahamic origin, include circling the Ka'ba seven times, and going seven times between the mountains of Safa and Marwa as did Hagar during her search for water. The pilgrims stand together on the wide plain of Arafa and join in prayers for God's forgiveness, in what is often thought of as a preview of the Last Judgement. In previous centuries Hajj was a difficult activity. Today however, Saudi Arabia provides millions of people with water, modern transport, and the most up-to-date health facilities. The close of the Hajj is marked by a festival, the Eid al-Adha, which is celebrated with prayers and the exchange of gifts in Muslim communities everywhere. This, and the Eid al-Fitr, a feast-day commemorating the end of Ramadan, are the main festivals of the Muslim Calendar. ...read more.

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