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The Reduction of Prejudice.

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Introduction

Emma Gregory 18th Oct. 2003 The Reduction of Prejudice It is prejudice that I am concerned with and ways that you can reduce it in order to stop discrimination happening. To stop prejudice attitudes increasing we need to get rid of the idea of stereotyping people in a bad way. Below is a list of ways in which prejudice can be, and has tried, to be reduced. ? Enforced contact Deustch and Collins (1951) looked at two housing estate- one where black and white residents live separately and another where they lived together. The study showed that prejudice remained the same, or increased, in the separate housing, whereas it decreased on the estate where they lived together. ...read more.

Middle

A class was divided into groups and were given a project to research. Each group member had a piece of the 'puzzle' which they then taught to the other group members. While the study improved self-esteem, improved academic performance, increased liking of peers and improved ethnic perceptions, but changes were minimal. Co-operation is needed on a bigger scale, such as in the home and cultural influences. ? Super ordinate goal The Robber's Cave shows how if people have the same goal in mind, they work as a team and prejudice diminishes. ? Persuasion Advertising has been used to change behaviour- like smoking. ...read more.

Conclusion

It is particularly found in TV programmes. ? Direct instruction or education This can counter negative attitudes, particularly if it comes from parents and school. McGuire (1964) suggested the Inoculation approach as a defence against persuasion to things such as smoking. Children need to be provided with counter- arguments against attitudes and behaviour they will encounter in life. He found this was more effective. Bern (1983) suggested that sexism can be counteracted in children by teaching them that gender is a biological factor and not determined by clothes or toys. ? Raising awareness by media The media is a powerful tool and should be used positively, like persuasion, to help dissolve prejudice attitudes. People are unaware just how the media affects them, in particular TV and radio, therefore they would not realise if they are being influenced. ...read more.

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