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The Sikh Religion and Charity

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Introduction

´╗┐Sikhism and charity This essay is going to talk about the Sikhs views of charity and also charity itself, furthermore I will be discussing about the Sikh teachings of equality and principles and also some of the different viewpoints that different religions have of charity. What are human rights? Human rights are the rights that every living person is obliged to and must be given and acted as an act of humanity. Human rights belong to every person in this world and cannot be taken away from us regardless of gender place of residence or status and some of our human rights are: 1. ...read more.

Middle

Furthermore charities show love and generosity towards others or humanity and are helping those who are less fortunate and in need. Furthermore the reason why charities are important is because without charities those who are suffering would never been able to live because they do not have any support from their government or any type of authority which could help them to improve daily life, moreover without charity people would not know what is happening to other people in the world and how they can help for a good cause and make Planet Earth a happy place for everyone. ...read more.

Conclusion

And with all different kinds of religion everyone has a different view point of charity but all put to practise in different way and help people in this world and make their life and this world a better place What are the three golden rules in the Sikh religion? The three golden rules are a major act and part of the Sikh religion and are a major part of guru Nanaks teaching of equality and charity and are the following: Nam Japana: Remembering god Kirat Karna: Which means earning an honest earning. Vand Chakana: Sharing gods wealth with the less fortunate ...read more.

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