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'The Subtle Knife' written by Phillip Pullman - review

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Hatice Giritli Group 9 Friday 29th October 2004 My Book Review of the Week: The Subtle Knife This week I chose to read the novel 'The Subtle Knife' written by Phillip Pullman. Philip Pullman was born in Norwich on 19th October 1946. The early part of his life was spent travelling all over the world, because his father and then his step father were both in the Royal Air Force. He spent part of his childhood in Australia, where he first met the wonders of comics, and grew to love Superman and Batman in particular. From the age of 11, he lived in North Wales, having moved back to Britain. It was a time when children were allowed to roam anywhere, to play in the streets, to wander over the hills, and he took full advantage of it. His English teacher, Miss Enid Jones, was a big influence on him, and he still sends her copies of his books. ...read more.


Although he does not know it, their lives are soon to become forever intertwined when Lyra's alethiometer gives her one simple command: Help Will find his father. Philip Pullman gives his readers precisely the satisfactions they look for in a novel: well-made, absorbing characters, supreme elegance of style and tone, a richly inventive imaginative landscape, and, some very big ideas fearlessly explored. His style of writing is descriptive and imaginative. The themes used in "The Subtle Knife" are betrayal, when Will leaves his mother and runs away from his own world to escape the police, he betrays his mother, Good vs. Evil, the trilogy challenges our assumptions about good and evil: some witches are good, while some members of the church are evil. Other themes used in the novel are Courage, when Lyra and Will leave their daemons behind in the world of dead to rescue Roger and the other spirits, fear, when Will and Lyra fear that they will lose each other, trust, the trust that develops between Lyra and Will and the rest of Lyra's friends and love, between Lyra and Will. ...read more.


uses for the blade's edges, John Parry, Will's father who vanished long ago before Will was able to remember him and Ruta Skadi: Queen of the Latvian witches. I think there is no target audience for this novel because I believe it is something that can be read by all age groups. In conclusion I found the novel " The Subtle Knife" by Philip Pullman very interesting and enjoyable. I liked it because of Philip Pullman's use of imagination and the idea of many different world in one world and the use of imaginative vocabulary such as 'daemon' and 'alethiometer'. Out of ten I would rate "The Subtle Knife" a ten because I enjoyed reading it and I like the way Philip Pullman has constructed different worlds that are travelled through with one extraordinary knife that would cut through anything. I would not only recommend it to people my age but to everybody interested in adventure or fantasy stories. By Hatice Giritli Group 9 ...read more.

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