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The thorny issue of social exclusion is once again in the headlines.

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Introduction

The thorny issue of social exclusion is once again in the headlines as Tony Blair and other senior cabinet members are visiting Tower Hamlets in London's East End - one of Britain's poorest areas - to mark the launch of a new package of measures aimed at addressing the problems of urban deprivation. Britain's most deprived areas are being invited to bid for their share of the cash pile, said to be worth around �130 million. The scheme is hoping to help up to 900 wards in 88 of Britain's poorest communities, though the initial pilot will involve only 30 wards. One of the key features of the scheme will involve the appointment of a centrally-funded 'Neighbourhood Manager' in each of the problem areas. Their role will involve close liaison with the residents in a bid to trouble shoot the cause of localised problems. This will require a certain degree of local knowledge, influence and authority if the appointments are to prove effective. Crime, health, education and housing are the main areas which are to be targeted. ...read more.

Middle

Neighbourhoods with high rates of unemployment, high rates of crime, poor health and poor schooling - with a worse quality of life by virtually every measure than families who live just a few streets away. Meanwhile in a separate Scottish initiative, Jackie Baillie, the Scottish communities minister is to announce a �90 million fund to tackle deprivation in Scottish cities. The money will be shared by 12 councils, with the majority of the cash going to councils on the west coast. Glasgow is to receive the largest share, worth �27 million. Ms Baillie announced, "We are taking our war on poverty and exclusion further in Scotland's poorest neighbourhoods." The thorny issue of social exclusion is once again in the headlines as Tony Blair and other senior cabinet members are visiting Tower Hamlets in London's East End - one of Britain's poorest areas - to mark the launch of a new package of measures aimed at addressing the problems of urban deprivation. Britain's most deprived areas are being invited to bid for their share of the cash pile, said to be worth around �130 million. ...read more.

Conclusion

and crime (ensuring that nowhere in England has a burglary rate of more than 3 times the national average). Clearly this sort of policy is aimed at weeding out the real trouble spots and bringing them more closely in line with the rest of the country. Mo Mowlam described the initiative as a "new drive to close the poverty gap." She said that she recognised "that there are still too many communities, too many families, not sharing in our rising prosperity. Neighbourhoods with high rates of unemployment, high rates of crime, poor health and poor schooling - with a worse quality of life by virtually every measure than families who live just a few streets away. Meanwhile in a separate Scottish initiative, Jackie Baillie, the Scottish communities minister is to announce a �90 million fund to tackle deprivation in Scottish cities. The money will be shared by 12 councils, with the majority of the cash going to councils on the west coast. Glasgow is to receive the largest share, worth �27 million. Ms Baillie announced, "We are taking our war on poverty and exclusion further in Scotland's poorest neighbourhoods." ...read more.

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