GCSE: Euthanasia

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261 GCSE Euthanasia essays

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  1. Christian views on suicide

    • Essay length: 597 words
    • Submitted: 18/05/2012
  2. Euthanasia - Right or Wrong?

    • Essay length: 1000 words
    • Submitted: 05/06/2011
  3. Explaining Euthanasia

    • Essay length: 799 words
    • Submitted: 26/09/2010
  4. The benefits of euthanasia to Christians

    • Essay length: 1715 words
    • Submitted: 26/09/2010
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Religious Studies involves more than just study the world's great religions. In studying the subject you may end up covering how spirituality underpins our culture, how belief systems inform how we treat each other, animal life and the world around us, and the role religion plays in societies around the globe. Youll pick up some valuable skills along the way too: analytical thinking and critical judgement, the ability to work with others, skills of expression and discussion, and ways in which you can negotiate and resolve argument.

You will cover the major global religions (and specialising in one or two), ethics, crime and punishment, personal relationships and the family and the response of societies to issues like poverty in different parts of the world. You'll need to be able to clearly discuss relevantpoints in your assignments and Marked by Teachers have a comprehensive range of assessed RS essays, which you can access to build the skills you need.

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Conclusion analysis

Good conclusions usually refer back to the question or title and address it directly - for example by using key words from the title.
How well do you think these conclusions address the title or question? Answering these questions should help you find out.

  1. Do they use key words from the title or question?
  2. Do they answer the question directly?
  3. Can you work out the question or title just by reading the conclusion?
  • Would removing life support from an individual in a permanently vegetative state be morally wrong? Discuss with reference to: a) the sanctity of life and b) the doctrine of double effect.

    "A separate argument could be the slippery slope. This argument can be used with many arguments such as legalization. The legalization of cannabis is often looked upon however if it was legal then wouldn't more harmful drugs become closer and closer to legalization? The argument seems to fall down a slippery slope and others follow. I can link this argument with euthanasia, if voluntary active euthanasia is allowed, then people would argue why involuntary passive euthanasia is not acceptable. This could lead to a knock-on effect, which could of started from a small event taking place leading to anything whatsoever. I believe that removing life from a person in a PVS is acceptable on the grounds that it is authorized with doctors and known to be 100% true that the patient will not recover from the vegetative state he or she is in. I also believe that letting the patient die is equally acceptable as to killing the patient with a lethal drug, letting somebody die is just as bad as killing someone in most cases."

  • Analyse the Way In Which a T.V Soap Opera Has Dealt With a Religious or Moral Issue.

    "After taking into consideration both sides of the argument I have come to a conclusion, and my own personal opinion is that euthanasia should be allowed. Even taking into account it will affect the loved ones of someone I still believe if someone is in so much pain he/she couldn't take it any more, subsequently it would seem fair to respect their decision."

  • To what Extent was Hitler’s Euthanasia policy a distinct “Nazi” Policy?

    "In conclusion to all the evidence provided that the Euthanasia program was a great indicator for the later establishment of the concentration camps for the Jews. In my opinion the Euthanasia was to an extent not a distinctive Nazi policy but merely a quick and easy cover for Hitler's hatred for Jews. What Hitler did certainly did not follow the definition for euthanasia and can be said that he manipulated it to his own version of euthanasia but the original euthanasia cannot be credited to the Nazi policy. The involuntary euthanasia of children and adolescents who were mentally or physically challenged, although considered murder was still in the constraints of the euthanasia policy. Hitler's aims for this was not the extermination of mentally disabled but more the cleansing of Jews from the German infrastructure. Hitler intended on establishing an "arichen Herrenvolk" 15which was known as the Aryan race, the race without impure blood or disabilities. He did so once in the late 1930's and the same idea carried through to the concentration camps for Jews later on."

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