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There are many cases for the fact that the Buddha was a Shramana because he had agreements with most of them, but he also had his disagreements. Perhaps he wasn't a Shramana or in fact a member of any religious group except for his own.

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Introduction

Robert Hicks 13.10.2005 Homework 4 (A02) Was Guatama a Shramana? At the time of the Buddha there was great upheaval within society, with regards to peoples differing religious beliefs. The Aryan invaders had brought with them Hinduism and this in turn brought about the caste system in which the people were generally unsatisfied and wanted to find out the truth for themselves. The Buddha also believed this; that you have to find and experience life for yourself in order to reach enlightenment. Hedonism and extreme asceticism were at the opposite ends of the spectrum, this is where the Buddha found the middle way, but only after experiencing these differing lifestyles for himself. ...read more.

Middle

The Buddha disagreed with this and believed in rebirth. He had no time for the Sceptics who spent all of their time thinking about the negatives and little about the positives. He regarded them as a simple waste of time. Although the Buddha had practiced extreme asceticism in order to reach enlightenment, he felt that the Jains overdid this practice and that their view on the soul was wrong with regards to it being independent of the body. He also disagreed with the Ajivakas in that their belief is everything is determined by fate and that you can't change your destiny. He felt their teachings led to immorality and this denied human responsibility. ...read more.

Conclusion

There are many cases for the fact that the Buddha was a Shramana because he had agreements with most of them, but he also had his disagreements. Perhaps he wasn't a Shramana or in fact a member of any religious group except for his own. Time has proven that the Buddha was the pioneer of Buddhism itself and clearly he had his own ideas that many people were to believe in and practice, both during and after his life. I believe that the Buddha had Shraman tendencies that through his own experiences, he adapted and evolved into what we now know as Buddhism. It could be said that Buddhism is not a religion but perhaps more of a philosophy because one of the unique aspects is that you don't have to believe in a God or Gods to practice Buddhism. The local folk traditions 1 ...read more.

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