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To pull the plug or not to pull the plug...is that the question? The question of Euthanasia has received increased attention in recent years as the result of the dramatic advances that have been made in medical technology

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Introduction

Pulling the Plug: To pull the plug or not to pull the plug...is that the question? The question of Euthanasia has received increased attention in recent years as the result of the dramatic advances that have been made in medical technology. While the problem itself is an ancient one, rooted in the conflict between the duty to relieve suffering and the duty to preserve human life. Euthanasia has been in society since ancient Greek times, if not before then. Euthanasia is a classical Greek term meaning "easy, happy death" (Wilson, 9). Legalizing Euthanasia, as a whole is not the best decision for our country although in certain situations is justifiable. First of all, one must consider what determines brain death. Secondly, where does society draw the line on what makes a person eligible to consider Euthanasia? Finally, Euthanasia is not something that can be defined easily it has many categories that suit different situations and has different meanings. Lots of people would argue that Legalizing Euthanasia in our country is a decision that bests suits our present society. This argument basically states that all forms of Euthanasia should be accepted. The problem with this type of thinking is that it doesn't consider all the various and controversial parts of Euthanasia. First of all Euthanasia is not just one meaning, it can be broken down into different categories that differ in meaning. ...read more.

Middle

Brain Death has to be properly defined before you can legalize Euthanasia, for there are to many broad and troubling concerns to be considered with medical ethics. For society to make Euthanasia legal, many things need to be defined, it is not a simple yes or no answer solved by enactment of one new law. The question of when should an individual consider Euthanasia as an option, is not something a single written law can handle. One law can not cover every single case of human suffering. If you were to Legalize Euthanasia as a whole where would you draw the line on the amount of human suffering needed to assist death. One law can not accurately determine a euthanasia decision. A person is depressed; do they have the right use a Euthanasia law? Different circumstances call for different options and choices even if you feel bad for a person suffering does that mean their life is worthless? That they should give up hope? Depressed patients can receive therapy and medicine to help with their problems. A lot of depression cases can be solved and there is a high rate of recovery (Peck, 43). When doctors told Sue Rodriguez she was dying of Lou Gehrig's disease, she turned her despair into determination and used her last months to fight for the right to die her way. ...read more.

Conclusion

Some people see Involuntary Euthanasia as murder because the patient specifically asked not to be taken off life support without extreme efforts to save their life, but the doctor or family ignored their decision (Lindsay, 77). Finally, there is Active Euthanasia when death is induced either by direct action to terminate life or by indirect action such as giving drugs in amounts that would clearly hasten death (Peck, 18). Some would limit the use of the term to direct and intentional action to end a life, however under our present laws is considered murder (Russell, 19). Even giving drugs to relieve pain that may hasten death is also a criminal act. Though proof of such intent might be very difficult to prove, even if a physician merely provides the means for a patient to end their own life. This act is illegal in most states and countries because the physician is aiding a person to commit suicide (Kjellstrand, 118). All of these types of Euthanasia can carry their own specific circumstances and different problems making it very difficult to simplify Euthanasia under one label and justify its legalization. In conclusion, Legalizing Euthanasia as a whole is not the best decision for our country, however in certain well-defined situations it can be justifiable and legalized. Once we determine what is brain death. And where does society draw the line on what makes a person eligible to consider Euthanasia. Finally, that euthanasia is not considered one encompassing act but properly recognized in it's many categories that suit different situations and has different meanings. ...read more.

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