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What are the facts and philosophical points of contention in Platonic, Aristotelian and Christian worldviews? What do you think, as a philosopher about these things?

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Introduction

Knowledge & Reality What are the facts and philosophical points of contention in Platonic, Aristotelian and Christian worldviews? What do you think, as a philosopher about these things? I propose in this essay to examine the certain concepts of Metaphysics and propositions of the philosophical mind from Platonism, Aristotelianism, and Christian worldviews. There are also a certain degree of contention between each segment of views to which will also be addressed accordingly. Before we turn to the more specific task, however, we must first sketch the general framework of ideas in terms of where philosophy approaches these contentions. The term Metaphysics (Grk. Meta: "after") is the speculations of what questions arise about the meaning of the universe. Questions such as "what is real?" or "what kinds of things exist?" It is the science of being and is concerned with what lies beyond the physical realm we already know. Immersing further into metaphysics we begin to concern ourselves with the dualistic nature of the universe or the hylomorphic conception of the world. This means the difference between matter and form. The dualistic nature of the universe refers to both reality (matter/physical) and form (spiritual). Matter can consist of that which is tangible such as a table made of wood. An example of the Form or spiritual can be considered the mind; it is something we cannot touch and is intangible. The Materialist such would say that only physical things exist, the Idealists consider only Spiritual entities as real, and the dualist believes that both are real. ...read more.

Middle

Rather is was already in the material around us (another way to say it is that the potential for forms is in the material), and just had to be discovered, therefore our thoughts as humans are motivated by the materials around us. This is why when we are born; our wealth or ideas are already around us we simply haven't been exposed to them as long as someone who was 25 years of age. So matter becomes the "real" material cause for potentiality in this world. Aristotle also proposed another idea that motions or changes in objects occur because they are trying to reach a perfect goal. This was his "teleological" thought process. A seed grows into a plant, or a larva grows into a butterfly. A pattern exists in all these examples that tells us there is a goal to matter. So Aristotle also contended that matter has the potential to reach an end goal. That end goal is relative only to its species. Yet Aristotle also explained that matter and object had an ultimate goal to become its pure form. This pure form is a state without matter. He came up with this idea from looking at the world around us. The planets and stars only change positions as far as he could tell they never changed form. On the earth however, we are always far more removed from becoming devoid of matter. However humans can come to a pure form only by searching for it. ...read more.

Conclusion

Some Christian religions such as Roman Catholic theology by way of Thomas Aquinas embrace these theories in combination with their own, and modern Western thought still teaches them. Aristotle is recognized by religions for providing a cause for man to see God through nature (the form is inherent in the matter). My opinion as a philosopher of concerning these ideas of contention is cautious. Platonic reasoning did not persuade me that ideas are only that which is real and the one true goal. He does give cause for why the spiritual world is real yet he does provides the mechanism of destruction as the difference between the two realms, and does not recognize a creator. His teaching is limited and left with many unanswered questions, like, "What created forms? Or how do you know they exist through your own mind? Is the fact that you think real or material and if it is real then how do you know?" Aristotle impressed me with his views of the nature of things. In some places he does provide a corollary to Christianity, his theory of an unmoved mover was close to representing an actual God that directs the affairs of the earth. The way that Christians use Aristotelianism to give reason for Christianity if understood and explained carefully can be used properly as a case for Christ. Upon my own standpoint as a Christian it has saddened me often more than once how they have come ever so close to knowing there is a divine creator, and yet have strayed so far upon getting there. ...read more.

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