• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What Christian Teaching I Would Include In A Booklet On Warfare?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

26th October 2001 Douglas Rubashow 10.1 What Christian Teaching I Would Include In A Booklet On Warfare First and foremost I want to say that in a booklet about warfare, including Christian teaching, I believe that there might be some way I could make it right from a Christian perspective, and I will try to be objective, and consider all sides of the argument. I believe that most war is wrong, however. In a booklet on Christian teaching about warfare, I would have to include the Ten Commandments, or at least a couple of them. It does say you shall not murder, and in warfare, you kill many thousands or even millions of people, and if it is wrong to kill one person, then it must be very wrong to kill thousands and thousands of people. I would also have to include the commandment you shall not steal, because I believe that when you kill someone, you are stealing a life. There are two more commandments that I would put in, the first is you shall not make yourself an idol, now this may seem a bit strange, but when there is a war going on, you often make yourself an idol. ...read more.

Middle

I think that the only thing that could even begin to justify warfare for Christians would have to be the Just War theory, which was invented by St. Augustine of Hippo, who was the Christian theologian to attempt to provide a logical Christian justification for war. He regarded war as evil but argued that sometimes it was necessary to combat a greater evil, therefore starting a war. I personally don't believe in the just war theory, but I can see that some Christians would find a way to justify war to themselves because of the just war theory, I mean some people might believe that this is connected to situation ethics, with the point that says, 'there must be the right intentions, the intent must be to do good and avoid evil, and some Christians might believe this to be about the most loving thing to do. Christians might go by the seven main points of the just war theory, if it was completely necessary to go to war, however I think their religion would compel them not to go to war unless it was completely necessary. ...read more.

Conclusion

Jesus, in Matthew 5:9. 'Peace is what I leave with you; it is my own peace that I give you.' Jesus, in John 14:27. 'It was late that Sunday evening, (the night Jesus rose from the dead) and the disciples were gathered behind locked doors, because they were afraid of the Jewish authorities. Then Jesus came and stood among them ' Peace be with you,' he said. After saying this, he showed them his hands and his side. The disciples were filled with joy at seeing the Lord. Jesus said to them again, 'Peace be with you. As the father sent me, so I send you...' John 20:19-21. 'And God's peace, which is far beyond human understanding, will keep your hearts and minds safe in union with Christ Jesus.' Paul, in Philippians 4:7. 'May God, our source of peace, be with all of you.' Paul, in Romans 15:33. In conclusion, I think that the just war theory is the only piece of information I've given you that begin to justify warfare for Christians, and all in all, I don't think many Christians would think about war, unless forced to do so. By Douglas Rubashow 10 S ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Morality of War section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Morality of War essays

  1. Christian views on a just war.

    they never been born," which may sound a cruel thing to say, but what Jesus really meant was that it was going to be difficult to forget what Judas was about to do to him. Another point strongly agreeing with the statement is, human beings can learn from their mistakes,

  2. Describe the teachings of Christianity about war and pacifism

    'Blessed are the peacemakers' Matthew 5;9. They believe that it is against their conscious. - 3 - The Quakers are a branch of Christianity who are completely opposed to war, they do recognise that there is evil in the word but they teach that it can't be defeated by violence, weapons and war.

  1. Evolution of warfare in the war of the professionals

    Also, changes in weapon technology occurred. The matchlock musket was replaced with the flintlock which made possible a discharge of three rounds a minute and the establishment of three ranks with simultaneous fire. Another change was the invention of the ring bayonet which made it possible to eliminate pikes from the battlefield altogether.

  2. Some Christians believe in the Just War Theory which was originally written in the ...

    He believed all violence was wrong, it didn't solve any thing is just created more problems in the future. * Christians could join an organisation like CND (campaign for nuclear disarmament) * Read the bible where Jesus cleansed the traders from the temple in Jerusalem and remember Jesus was just

  1. Domestic violence.

    For many couples the arrival of a baby is a happy time, for some women pregnancy is far from a time of safety and may result in an increase in existing patterns of violence.

  2. We live in a world of armed conflict - Explain what differing Christian beliefs ...

    He believed the government was corrupt and sanctions and sporting ties were broken to put pressure on the government but to no avail. It was a last resort in compliance with the Just war theory and it was to promote good.

  1. What Teachings would I include in a Christian Booklet on Warfare

    The first class that resulted in an armed response would be conceived as a defensive war and required "no special moral justification". It was seen as an involuntary act forced upon a nation. The second class, an injurious action taken against a peaceful nation, would be classified as an aggressive war, which would need to be justified.

  2. To what extent if at all might a religious ethic be pacifist?

    If pacifism was a part of Christianity it would have to be through its absolute form, for this implies acting through duty, therefore involving the use of rational thought and the deontological principles of Christianity. Yet we have already identified the problematic idealistic nature of absolute pacifism.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work