• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What is Jainism?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Jainism What is Jainism? One of the oldest religions in the world Jainism is centred on the search for infinite knowledge and ultimate enlightenment. Practiced through 3 basic principals Jainism is founded upon Non-Violence, Penance and Self Control. The name "Jainism" derives from the Sanskrit word meaning "follower of the Jina, or conqueror". Established in our era by Lord Mahavir ("the Great Hero") in the sixth century BCE who is considered to be the last in a list of 24 "Tirthankaras". What is a Tirthankara? A prophet of Jainism who has conquered all the desires and has obtained infinite knowledge and wisdom, they lay down the path for the spiritual uplift of humanity. There are 24 Tirthankaras: first known is Rushabhdev and Lord Mahavira Svami being the last, born 2,500 years ago. Born in 599 BC, Mahavir was a prince who left his worldly belongings and at the age 30 became a monk, he then spent 12 years in meditation. He established a monastic community into four groups: Sadhu (monk), Sadvi (nun), Shravak (layman) and Shravika (laywoman) this community being the oldest continually surviving monastic community in the world. ...read more.

Middle

The two main sects of Jains are divided into Digambara and Svetambara, both claiming that authority for the most ancient texts derives from Mahavir, that was in turn enunciating sacred truths passed onto him from Tirthankaras before him. Handed down orally in the monastic communities, the sacred literature was not written down until about 500 CE. The main differences between these two traditions of Jainism are that Digambaras believe that humans engage in no bodily functions or worldly activity, preaching by divine sound. Svetambaras see the Jina as engaging in normal bodily functions and activity whilst at the same time enjoying omniscient recognition. The Digambaras stress absolute nudity resulting in women unable to attain purity, as they are unable to live completely naked, they can only aspire to a Siddha by being re born as a man. Svetambaras emphasise optional nature of nudity, wearing a simple white robe being permitted, and enabling women to conquer purity. Jainism stresses that each person is responsible for his or her own destiny. Man is born individually and dies the same, he alone can help himself by his own effort, and through right knowledge and right vision and right conduct he can attain ultimate state of emancipation. ...read more.

Conclusion

Navka Mantra 1. Salutations to the victors - ARHATS, the Arhat is the living being of the highest goal in Jainism. 2. Salutations to the SIDDHA, Siddhas are the liberated soul, free from the cycle of birth and death. 3. Salutations to the head spiritual teachers called Acharyas. 4. Salutations to the teachers. 5. Salutations to the monks. The writing in the centre of the palm is the word Ahimsa. The hand signifies friendly re-assurance. Namaskar Mantra: Namo Arithantanam - I bow to the arithantas - the ever-perfect spiritual victors. Namo Siddhanam - I bow to the Siddhas - the liberated souls Namo Ayraiyanam - I bow to the ayraiyanam - the leaders of the Jain order. Namo Uvajjhayanam - I bow to the upadhyayas - the learned preceptors. Namo Loe SavvaSahunam- I bow to all the saints and sages everywhere in the world. Eso Panch Namukkaro - These five obeisances. Savva Pavappanasano - Erase all sins. Manglalananch Savvesim - Amongst all that is auspicious. Padhamam Havai Mangalam - This is the foremost. In the above prayer, Jains do not ask for any favours or material benefits from the Tirthankaras, monks or nuns. By saluting them, Jains receive the inspiration from the five benevolent for the right path of true happiness and total freedom from the misery of life. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Hinduism section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Hinduism essays

  1. Descriptive Writing

    glanced across to the lake you can see fisher men on Styrofoam floats doing their daily duties. We wanted to see how they worked so after getting used to the floats, we were able to go into the middle of the deep and dark waters of the lake.

  2. Hinduism and Islam on human relationships.

    Sex is believed to be a good thing and should be enjoyed. It is also needed to produce children (or more importantly sons). This is why sex is seen as a duty of married life. Although sex should be enjoyed, Hinduism is very strict about the teaching of self-control and is against all sorts of prostitution.

  1. Hinduism - Death and the afterlife AO1, AO2, AO3

    "Everyone should enjoy their life and forget about what might happen next" I think that a Hindu would disagree with this statement because they believe that what happens in this life can affect their next.

  2. The Nature of Belief

    They say a prayer (Aarti) which involves praising Bhagvan and thanking him for giving them life. In India there are travelling groups of musicians and dancers who take their performance into the villages and towns.

  1. hinduism: ahimsa

    Another thing I dislike about Hinduism is how focused they are when it comes to Karma and Dharma, your actions and duty. My dislike here ties in with the Caste System. Because of their strong believe in Karma and Dharma, most Hindus prefer to work into the family jobs they were 'born to do.'

  2. Attacks on religious minotirties in Bangaladesh

    A comparative picture shows that the number of the Muslim majority increased 219.5 per cent while the Hindu community increased by 4.5 per cent. If normal increase rate prevailed, the number of the Hindu community in this country would have been 32.5 million, but the Hindu population in Bangladesh stood

  1. Describe Hindu belief in respect for all living creatures.

    Explain the significance of cow protection and vegetarianism in Hinduism. Hindus adopt many practices of cow-protection and are mostly vegetarian. The main reasons for Hindus not eating beef are mostly religious ones. It is a clear sign of religious purity and caste status not to eat any kind of meat.

  2. Describe a visit to a Hindu place of pilgrimage, explaining its importance to believers.

    It has a huge relief map of the Indian sub-continent showing all its rivers, mountains and pilgrimages. The 19th century Durga temple, 4 kms from Godaulia, is also popularly known as the 'monkey temple' because of an overwhelming presence of the primates.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work