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What was the nature of extremt nationalism in the late nineteenth century

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Introduction

What was the nature of extremt nationalism in the late nineteenth century? Racism was becoming a key in nationalist views towards the end of the nineteenth century, particularly in Germany, where the Jew was portrayed as "common implacable foe", by Theodor Fritsch in 1883. He also believed in eugenics; a philosophy that aims to improve human hereditary qualities, through ways such as selective breeding and genetic engineering. Some even went as far as to say that the theory of eugenics would not only save the state money, but also create a new, more intelligent human race.' People were trying to wipe out the weak people and races in order to create an intelligent world. ...read more.

Middle

K E Duehring was also a German racist, when he said about the Jews: "It is precisely the baptised Jews who infiltrate furthest, unhindered in all sectors of society and political life." Again, a German is speaking badly about a Jewish person. However, it was not only Jews who were discriminated against, it was also black people. Gobineau, a French man wrote a book called 'The inequality of Human Races', and in this he wrote comments such as "the dark races are the lowest on the scale"... and "the immense superiority of the white races", when he is talking about being intellectual. ...read more.

Conclusion

Hitler also had a favourite composer, called Richard Wagner. His works had a revolutionary side to them, and people of Israel wanted to ban him from playing in their country, because of relations to the Holocaust. Wagner's music was even played in concentration camps by Hitler and the Nazis (he was dead at this point), and Hitler was a huge fan of his anti-semetic views. Overall, the world was a very racist and socialist place at the end of the 19th century, particularly at the end of the 19th century, when composers such as Wagner, and writers such as Nietzsche were around. They simply spread these racist views, especially about Jewish people, in order to gain superiority and what they called "purity" for their own country. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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