• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What would you do if someone you loved asked you to help them die?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What would you do if someone you loved asked you to help them die? Euthanasia is the deliberate killing of a person for the benefit of that person. In most cases euthanasia is carried out because the person who dies asks for it, but there are some cases called euthanasia where a person can't make such a request. A person who undergoes euthanasia is terminally ill, but there are other situations in which some people want euthanasia. There are many meanings and ideas to many people about the value of human existence, but the question lies before each and every one of us- do human beings have the right to decide the issues of life and death for ourselves. Most religions disapprove of euthanasia. ...read more.

Middle

Virtually all religions state that those who become vulnerable through illness or disability deserve special care and protection, and that proper end of life care is a much better thing that euthanasia. Pope John Paul the 2nd sees euthanasia as grave violation of the law of god, since it is the deliberate and morally unacceptable killing of a human person. The Catholic Church regards euthanasia as morally wrong. It has always taught the absolute and unchanging value of the commandment '' you shall not kill". The church has said that "nothing and no one can in any way permit the killing of an innocent human being, whether a fetus or an embryo, an infant or an adult, an orderly person, or one suffering from an incurable disease, or a person who is dying." ...read more.

Conclusion

And lastly human life is special- Human beings are made in gods image, therefore they have a special value and dignity, this value doesn't depend on the quality of a particular life, even if that life is full of pain and suffering. God gave us our lives and god is the final authority over our lives. Solutions for people who request euthanasia should receive loving care, psychological and spiritual support, and appropriate remedies for pain and other symptoms. Medicines capable of alleviating or suppressing pain may be given to a dying person, even if this therapy may indirectly shorten the person's life so long as the intent is not to hasten death. Patients can then live with dignity until the time of their natural death, and again that's our gods choice. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Euthanasia section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Euthanasia essays

  1. My hypothesis: Euthanasia should be legalized in the UK.I am going to answer a ...

    * Proper palliative care makes Euthanasia unnecessary. Overall from all my research I am able to conclude that there is more evidence for Euthanasia, this is because as I have shown above in my questionnaires and interviews, some of my most reliable research, there is far more public support for Euthanasia than against it, however the media

  2. Should we have the right to die?

    will arise. But does having the right to die really solve the problem? It may actually hinder or prevent any hope of relieving pain. In Mr. Lim's case, he was flown over to Australia for a heart transplant. A donor has just died in an accident.

  1. Euthanasia and the Right to Die With Dignity

    Euthanasia and assisted suicide have their roots in the beliefs and practices of the ancient Romans and Greeks. For them euthanasia didn't imply the hastening of death. Their focus was on whether or not the person died a painless death, one which they met with peace of mind.

  2. UK Mother pleads for right to die.

    However, an application of this type - relating to a conscious, and, as yet, not completely disabled patient, has never been made. Mr Havers said there had been objections that a ruling in Mrs Pretty's favour would "open the floodgates" to others seeking similar undertakings from the DPP.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work