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A discussion on Catalysis.

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Introduction

Catalysis Catalysis is alteration of the speed of a chemical reaction, through the presence of an additional substance, known as a catalyst that remains chemically unchanged by the reaction. A catalyst in a solution with or in the same phase as the reactants is called a homogeneous catalyst. The catalyst combines with one of the reactants to form a compound that reacts more readily with the other reactants. ...read more.

Middle

2SO2(g) + O2(g) � 2SO3(g) NO2(g) A catalyst that is in a separate phase from the reactants is said to be a heterogeneous, or contact, catalyst. Contact catalysts are materials with the capability of adsorbing molecules of gases or liquids onto their surfaces. An example of heterogeneous catalysis is the use of finely divided platinum to catalyse the reaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen to form carbon dioxide. ...read more.

Conclusion

For example, if aluminium is added to finely divided iron, it increases the ability of the iron to catalyse the formation of ammonia from a mixture of nitrogen and hydrogen. Materials that reduce the effectiveness of a catalyst, on the other hand, are referred to as poisons. Lead compounds reduce the ability of platinum to act as a catalyst; therefore, an automobile equipped with a catalytic converter for emission control must be fuelled with unleaded gasoline. ?? ?? ?? ?? Jas Harrar L6W 23/04/07 ...read more.

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