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A parachute manufacturer wants to find a suitable design for a parachute, which will let fragile scientific interments land safely. You must research and design ways of solving this problem.

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Introduction

Carla Jones 11y set 1                                 Physics Investigation.

Brief:  A parachute manufacturer wants to find a suitable design for a parachute, which will let fragile scientific interments land safely. You must research and design ways of solving this problem. Having completed the practical you must make recommendations base d on your results.

Factors that I could chose to investigate.

There were many things that I could have chosen to investigate all of which I thought would make a difference to the fall, speed or landing of a parachute. These were :-

 Surface area of the parachute,

 Material used to make the parachute,

 The Shape of the parachute,

 The number of strings on the parachute,

 The mass of the load attached to the parachute,

 The weather conditions,

 The height from which the parachute is dropped,

 The surface the parachute and load land on and,

 The length of the strings.

 Surface area of the parachute.

Basic information

Background knowledge.

Explanation of air resistance.

An object that is falling through the atmosphere is subjected to two external forces.

...read more.

Middle

called the terminal velocity.

The following information was taken from a sky diving website and I have summarised the information give of the conditions they think best for skydiving. I think that it demonstrates how small changes could change the speed of the fall.

Drag Co-efficient The best way to describe this is the "thickness" of the air. Wave your hand about in the air quickly - not much resistance there. Now put your hand in a bathtub of water and try the same - it is harder work.  The water has a higher drag co-efficient than air. However, air does have a significant drag co-efficient too. Simply, the higher the drag, the slower speed things will fall at.

Surface area: This is the main part on which drag takes place. The larger the surface area, the more drag is created, and the slower things will fall.  E.g. Take a sheet of flat paper. Drop it, and watch it slowly fall. Now fold it in half twice and drop it again.

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Conclusion

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Scisors                                                                                                              selotape

Pen/pencil to mark black bin bag’                                                                    calculator.

String

Stop clock,

Weight,

Distance to drop parachute from

Ruler

Diagram.                                                                                      Stringimage00.pngimage01.png

                                                                                  Tape.image02.png

                                                                                          Black bin bag cut to required size

image01.png

Method.

Collect and set up all equipment as in diagrams above.

...read more.

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