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Acid rain in Europe

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Introduction

Introduction What is acid rain? What are the causes of acid rain? What are the effects of acid rain? What can be done to reduce acid rain? What can be done to reduce and repair the damage done by acid rain? How practical are these solutions? What are the different views and attitudes of different groups involved in the debate? Introduction The atmosphere is like a film of gases, which makes the planet habitable. If this layer was not present there would be no life on earth. It is a fact that the health of plants, animals and humans depends upon a very important factor 'pollution'. Although, all kinds of poisonous waste is continuing to be put into the atmosphere. These poisonous gases are being produced when fossil fuels are burnt, as a result of this acid rain forms which further more results in numerous problems damaging forests, lakes, rivers, land, plants and animals. The main culprits of burning fossil fuels are MEDC's, which insist on maintaining their high standards of living. What is acid rain? Rain is naturally acidic but the term 'acid rain' is usually referred to as rain, which has been made more acidic than it should be due to the atmosphere absorbing the gasses emitted from the burning of fossil fuels. ...read more.

Middle

Also, birds can die from eating "toxic" fish and insects and in turn fish can die from eating toxic insects some fish die before they are even born by the eggs being affected by the acid in the lake in some cases a whole generation can be wiped out. Fish usually die only when the acid level of a lake is high; when the acid level is lower, they can become sick, suffer stunted growth, or lose their ability to reproduce. On the left there is a picture showing dead fish, which have been effected by acid rain and on the right a food chain. Architecture, buildings and statues can also be destroyed by acid rain. Acid rain can damage buildings, stained glass, railroad lines, airplanes, cars, steel bridges, and underground pipes. Acid particles land on buildings, causing corrosion as the sulphur reacts with the minerals in the stone to form a powdery substance that can be washed away by rain. This powdery substance is called gypsum. This mainly occurs on sandstone and limestone. Currently, both the railway industry and the airplane industry have to spend a lot of money to repair the corrosive damage done by acid rain. ...read more.

Conclusion

Also liming on land is more difficult because there is so much more of it. Spraying the mixture of water and lime is a fairly good way, however, again it is expensive and would need to be done continuously. Catalytic converters is one of the best ways to reduce emissions and repair the damage done by acid rain the devices change the harmful nitrogen oxides into water, nitrogen and carbon dioxide which is still a pollutant but is less harmful. However, once again the prices of theses cars are fairly high and this will only work with lead free petrol. Many people would not agree with the government spending more money on pollution control, as the cost of electricity would go up. More efficient use of energy reduces the amount of fuel used and the amount of pollution produced. Although the 19 countries agreed to reduce sulphur emissions it is not able to solve the problem. In fact scientists have said "a cut of 80-90% is required to prevent further damage to the Swedish environment. Energy being produced from less polluting sources is a good idea but does have other implications on the environment. What are the different views and attitudes of different groups involved in the debate? ...read more.

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