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An Experiment Into the Thermal Decomposition of Metal Carbonates

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Introduction

An Experiment into the thermal decomposition of metal carbonates PLAN I propose to investigate the effect of heat on the breakdown of metal carbonates. Metal carbonates all decompose with varying ease, and the aim of this particular experiment is to find the order of ease of thermal decomposition in the metal carbonates. These are the 8 main types of metal carbonate. These are; * Potassium Carbonate * Sodium Carbonate * Calcium Carbonate * Magnesium Carbonate * Zinc Carbonate * Iron Carbonate * Lead Carbonate * Copper Carbonate I have chose 5 of these metals to investigate, to give me a reasonable spread of results. The way in which carbonates are formed is when a metal forms a covalent bond with carbon and oxygen. This usually occurs naturally, or can sometimes take place after a reaction of two other compounds. The strength of the covalent bond depends upon the metal's readiness to react with its surroundings. This gives me a good indication of my prediction. Copper carbonate is one of the metals, which I will experiment upon. This is the equation for the thermal decomposition of Copper carbonate. ...read more.

Middle

Put the information in the 10-second intervals in the table dawn out. Repeat the experiment once more. Experiment 3 Fill the water bath, allowing room for at least an extra 100ml of water. Fill the measuring cylinder up, invert it, placing fingers over the top of the cylinder and place in water bath, making sure that no air bubbles enter the cylinder. Measure out exactly 0.5g of Zinc carbonate, and then put it into a boiling tube. Put a holed bung with a delivery tube in it onto the top of the boiling tube, secure that with a retort stand, as well as the measuring cylinder that is still inverted in the water bath. Put the Bunsen burner on a blue, non-roaring flame, and heat the bottom of the boiling tube. As soon as you start to heat the tube, press the start button on the stopwatch, and every 10 seconds, get down to and measure the amount of water displaced. Put the information in the 10 second intervals in the table dawn out. Repeat the experiment once more. Experiment 4 Fill the water bath, allowing room for at least an extra 100ml of water. ...read more.

Conclusion

Amount of CO2 produced Time in seconds Experment number 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Experiment 1:1 5 6 7 7 8 8 9 9 9 9 Experiment 1:2 3 4 5 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 Experiment 2:1 12 19 21 22 23 23 24 24 24 24 Experiment 2:2 16 20 22 23 23 24 24 25 25 25 Experiment 3:1 9 18 28 31 33 35 36 37 37 38 Experiment 3:2 11 20 29 34 36 37 38 39 39 39 Experiment 4:1 14 24 33 42 49 50 52 53 53 54 Experiment 4:2 13 24 32 43 50 53 54 55 55 55 Experiment 5:1 9 19 30 42 51 61 66 72 73 73 Experiment 5:2 11 21 33 43 52 60 64 68 70 71 Total Average Amount of CO2 produced Time in seconds Experment number 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Experiment 1 4 5 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 Experiment 2 14 20 22 23 23 24 24 25 25 25 Experiment 3 10 19 29 33 35 36 37 38 38 39 Experiment 4 14 24 33 43 50 52 53 54 54 55 Experiment 5 10 20 32 43 52 61 65 70 72 72 ...read more.

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