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An Experiment to find out the effect of temperature on the height to which a squash ball bounces.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

H. Morgan                08/05/2007

An Experiment to find out the effect of temperature on the height to which a squash ball bounces

Planning

This is an experiment to find out the effect of temperature on the height to which a squash ball bounces.  A squash ball is made of rubber and is hollow.

The height to which the ball bounces will depend on two variables, the initial height in which it is dropped, and the temperature of the ball.  For this experiment the temperature of the ball is being examined therefore the height in which it is dropped will stay the same to keep it a fair test.  The height will be 100cm.  The ruler will be held up by a clamp stand so that it can be kept straight.

To heat the ball, it will be put in a beaker of water, which has been heated by a kettle and the water will be left to cool, at every 10°C the ball will be dropped.  When the water is at room temperature and will cool no more, ice will be added to cool the water to zero degrees.

The range in which the measurements will be taking will be measured every 10 degrees. This is a good range and will allow 11 measurements to be taken (100°C - 0°C).

The temperature will be measured in degrees Kelvin.  The Kelvin scale begins at absolute zero and increases in degrees just like the Celsius scale.

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Middle

64

62

100

363

58

57

56

57

100

353

52

51

49

51

100

343

48

47

47

47

100

333

40

43

39

41

100

323

37

39

34

37

100

313

31

38

32

34

100

303

20

22

19

20

100

293

12

12

13

12

100

283

7

5

6

6

100

275

4

5

4

4

This is a table to show the results from this experiment (from the average) in comparison to the results of another group and the results from a computer program with this experiment on it.

Drop Height (cm)

Temp (K)

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Conclusion

There are other aspects of the experiment which could be tested to see the effect of the height of the drop, the surface of the table, the size of the ball (different amount of gas inside the ball), if the ball was hard, for example a hockey ball.  The experiment could also be tested by heating non-hollow balls to prove that it was the gas inside the squash ball that made the difference of how the ball bounced, this would be done with the same type of rubber as the one used in the squash ball and would be the same weight (24 grams).

In an extension of this experiment the pressure of the gas inside the ball could be calculated and compared with the height of bounce.  The pressure could be calculated by working out by measuring the time it takes for the ball to fall and bounce back.  Use this to work out the balls acceleration (∆v/t), use the acceleration to work out the force of the ball, Force = mass x acceleration (the mass being 24 grams).  Now that the force is known it can be divided by the area of the gas inside the ball to give the pressure of the gas inside the ball.

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This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

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