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An Experiment to Investigate the Factors which effect the Rate of Reaction between Magnesium and Sulphuric Acid.

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Introduction

An Experiment to Investigate the Factors which effect the Rate of Reaction between Magnesium and Sulphuric Acid Aim I plan to investigate the concentration of acid, in the reaction between dilute sulphuric acid and magnesium ribbon. The rate of a chemical reaction is a measure of how fast the reaction takes place. In this investigation I will test different concentrations of acid reacting with magnesium. Prediction I prediction that as the concentration of the sulphuric acid increases, the time taken for the magnesium to disappear decreases. I predict that when the concentration of the sulphuric acid doubles, the rate of the reaction doubles. Linking prediction to theory Reaction rate and concentration. The collision theory describes how the rate of reaction increases (the time taken for the magnesium ribbon to disappear when it is reacted with sulphuric acid) when the concentration of SO4 increases. As the reaction continues, the concentration of the reacting substances decreases and so does the rate of reaction. The reaction is speeded up if the number of collisions is increased. ...read more.

Middle

Amount of hydrogen produced (cm�) 0 0 5 0 10 0 15 1 20 1 25 1 30 2 35 2 40 3 45 4 50 5 55 6 60 7 65 7 70 7 75 8 80 9 85 9 90 9 95 10 100 10 I then plotted the graphs of these results (see computer generated graphs) and, as it is clear from working out the gradients (on graphs), the gradient for the graph of the 10% acid was lower than that of the one for 80% acid. This is clearly wrong, as the reaction should have slowed down with the diluted acid. I then repeated these two results: 100% acid 80% acid Time (secs) Amount of hydrogen produced (cm�) Time (secs) Amount of hydrogen produced (cm�) 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 0 10 9 10 3 15 8 15 7 20 17 20 12 25 25 25 17 30 21 35 25 I then plotted these graphs, along with those of 60% acid, 40% acid, and 20% acid, which I retrieved the results of in the trial run. ...read more.

Conclusion

2. We could have controlled factors in the investigation better (e.g. the stirring of the solution because if this is not done properly it can lead to incorrect results). 3. We may not have got the same amount of acid each time. 4. We may not have got the bung on correctly each time. 5. We may not have recorded the results / counted the amount of bubbles correctly. There are many reasons why the anomalies pointed out on my graph: 1. We may not have got exactly the same length magnesium each time. 2. We could have controlled factors in the investigation better (e.g. the stirring of the solution because if this is not done properly it can lead to incorrect results). 3. We may not have got the same amount of acid each time. 4. We may not have got the bung on correctly each time. Also, on the [hand drawn] graphs for 20% acid, there we a vast amount of anomalies. This is why I decided to draw the graph again, but with the line of best fit in a different position. This made the graph seem more fitting, and also made the gradient [of the line of best fit] seem more accurate. ...read more.

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