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an investigation about investigating various metal carbonates and hydrochloric acid such as calcium carbonate, Iron carbonate etc.

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Introduction

Metal Carbonates This coursework is based on an investigation about investigating various metal carbonates and hydrochloric acid such as calcium carbonate, Iron carbonate etc. To insure that the test is fair I will use the same amount of hydrochloric acid in the same container. This is highly important because we need to know what hydrochloric acid does as it's inside our body e.g. stomach. I will try to make experiment fair, so I will have to keep all the important factors in my experiment the same such as hydrochloric acid, test tube and various metal carbonates. I will have to use the same type and amount of hydrochloric acid in the same container to keep all my measurements fair. ...read more.

Middle

Apparatus Calcium carbonate (CaC03) Magnesium carbonate (MgC03) Lead carbonate (PbC03) Copper carbonate (CuC03) Sodium carbonate (NaC03) Iron carbonate (FeC03) Hydrochloric acid Measuring cylinder Test tube Hole stopper to fit test tube Bowl of water Stopwatch and a Plastic container Safety The experiment involves using concentrated acid, as a result at all times you must be very alert and MUST wear goggles. If any chemicals are spilt onto your hands it should be washed off immediately and reported to the teacher. When Calcium carbonate react with dilute hydrochloric acid, carbon dioxide is formed. For example, marble chips (containing calcium carbonate) reacting with hydrochloric acid. ...read more.

Conclusion

0 10ml 20 C 28ml Results Carbon dioxide can be easily made in the laboratory by resting calcium carbonate with hydrochloric acid. Carbon dioxide can be collected in a measuring cylinder, over water or by downward delivery. This is the opposite of the upward delivery used for hydrogen. Carbon dioxide is denser than air, so it sinks into the container pushes the air out. Salt, water and carbon dioxide are produced when metal carbonates or metal hydrogen carbonates react with acids. Carbon dioxide gas causes the fizzing; we know that the rock contains calcium carbonate. Carbon dioxide gas causes the fizzing when hydrochloric acid hits limestone, chalk or marble (calcium carbonate). The same products are made if calcium hydrogen carbonate is used instead of calcium carbonate. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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