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An investigation into energy released during heating with a range of alcoholic fuels

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Introduction

An investigation into energy released during heating with a range of alcoholic fuels By Michael Finley, 11LY PLANNING This experiment is designed to determine which fuel out of the eight tested releases the most energy, to determine which is best. We will be using Ethanol, Propan-1-ol, Butan-1-ol, Pentan-1-ol, Hexan-1-ol and Octan-1-ol. METHOD In order to collect the results, I will need to heat up some water with a micro burner powered by each alcoholic fuel. I will need to weigh the fuel before and after the experiments to see how much of the fuel has been used up. I will also need to take the temperature of the water before and after the experiment to see how much the temperature changed. The two changes should allow me to see which fuel releases the most energy. I will do the experiment three times and collect the results, and take the average. ...read more.

Middle

= 756 KJ/Mol 2062 + 746 = 2808 KJ/Mol, which is the energy needed to break the bonds. Then I calculated the energy released when new bonds are made: 2 x C=O (2 x 740) = 1480 KJ/Mol 4 x O-H (4 x 463) = 1852 KJ/Mol 1480 + 1852 = 3332 KJ/Mol To calculate the energy balance, I did: 3332 - 2808 = 523 KJ/Mol Therefore the molar mass of Methanol was 523 KJ/Mol To find the molar mass of Ethanol, I had to do: Ethanol = 524 KJ/Mol + Balance I worked the balance out to be: 2406 - 1918 = 488 I then calculated the molar mass of all the fuels. Methanol = 524 KJ/Mol Ethanol = 524 + 488 = 1012 KJ/Mol Propan-1-ol = 1012 + 488 = 1500 KJ/Mol Butan-1-ol = 1500 + 488 = 1988 KJ/Mol Pentan-1-ol = 1988 + 488 = 2476 KJ/Mol Hexan-1-ol = 2476 + 488 = 2964 KJ/Mol ...read more.

Conclusion

REVISED DIAGRAM OF APPARATUS SECONDARY TESTS Fuel Starting temp/weight Finishing temp/weight Temp/weight change Ethanol 14�C/73.25g 37�C/71.91g 23�C/1.34g Octan-1-ol 18�C/73.49g 44�C/73.39g 26�C/0.1g We used a beer can with air holes in to insulate the Micro burner - we also moved the micro burner to 2cm away from the boiling tube rather than 6cm. RESULTS For this test (And the two before hand) I used 10cm3 of water. Test One Temperature Start Temp End Temp Change in Temp 19�C 32�C 13�C 20�C 31�C 11�C 22�C 32�C 10�C 18�C 29�C 11�C 18�C 30�C 12�C 19�C 30�C 11�C 18�C 28�C 10 Test Two Temperature Start Temp. Finishing Temp. Temp. change 16�C 39�C 23�C 15�C 42�C 27�C 14�C 50�C 36�C 18�C 44�C 26�C 15�C 50�C 35�C 19�C 60�C 41�C 13�C 46�C 33�C Test three Temperature Start Temp. Finishing Temp. Temp. change 11�C 34�C 23�C 11�C 33�C 22�C 11�C 37�C 26�C 11�C 34�C 23�C 16�C 41�C 25�C 14�C 28�C 14�C 14�C 36�C 22�C ...read more.

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