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An investigation into finding the reactivity of different metals using different tests.

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Introduction

Title: An investigation into finding the reactivity of different metals using different tests. Aim: To design a series of tests that will allow 5 unknown metals to be placed in there order of reactivity. Hypothesis: It is predicted that a metal giving more gas out of a test tube during the test will be more likely to have a higher reactivity. It predicted that a metal giving less gas out of a test tube during the test will be more likely to have a lower reactivity. Diagram: Apparatus: Test tube, delivery tube, water bucket, bung, beaker, pipette, tripod, Bunsen burner, chronometer, electronic balance. Plan: Measure 0.30 grams of 5 different metals Place retort stand over Bunsen burner. Pour 5 ml of water using a pipette into a test tube. Attach test tube to the retort stand and boil the water. Place the metal into the test tube and at the same time start a chronometer. ...read more.

Middle

Stop the chronometer when metal has reacted. Do the same for the 4 different metals. Pour 5 ml of hydrochloric acid into a test tube. Measure 0.30 grams of 5 different metals. Fill a trough of water and submerge a measuring cylinder into the water. Place a delivery tube, so that it connects to the measuring cylinder. Place the metal in the test tube. Quickly connect the delivery tube to the test tube. Start a stopwatch. Measure the gas volume after 2 minutes. Do the same for all four other metals. Results: Time to react with boiling Volume of gas produce by reacting Most reactive metal Metal Name Initial Mass (g) water (seconds) with hydrochloric acid (ml) From 5-1 a 0.3 no reaction no 1 b 0.3 sank to bottom 29 ml 4 c 0.3 no reaction 21 ml 2 d 0.3 no reaction 22 ml 3 e 0.3 1.52 44 ml 5 Graph: See other paper Conclusion: Statement of results: Metal E is the most reactive of all metal. ...read more.

Conclusion

Metal A did not reacted at all with any test. This make the results anomalous, and affecting the rest of the results. Errors and Improvement: Three errors occurred during the experimentation. The first error occurred when the mass of the metals were measured. Some metal did not exactly weighted 0.3 gram. This may have affected the amount of gas produce when reacting with hydrochloric acid. To improve this error, measure the right mass. The second error occurred when the metal was added to the boiling water. The water was supposed to be at a temperature of 100 c to boil. The metal was added when only little bubble were coming from the bottom of the beaker. To improve this error, wait until the water boil up with big bubbles. This will prove that the water is at 100 c. The Third error occurred when the gas fill the measuring cylinder. The scale onto the measuring cylinder was too big to be measure accurately. To improve this error, use a measuring cylinder with a smaller scale. ...read more.

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