• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

An investigation into the effect of light intensity on the rate of photosynthesis on Canadian pondweed.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

An Investigation into the Effect of Light Intensity on the Rate of Photosynthesis on Canadian Pondweed Background Information: Photosynthesis is an organic chemical reaction which green plants use to produce glucose from carbon dioxide and water. Its equation is 6CO[2] + 6H[2]0 C[6]H[12]O[6] + 6O[2] However, carbon dioxide and water cannot react on their own "They have to be given energy to make them combine. The energy which green plants use for this is sunlight energy". We can determine that if sunlight gives the reaction energy, and increase in the intensity of the sunlight will give the reaction more energy, which will speed the reaction up. We can therefore safely predict that as the intensity of the light increases, so too will the speed of the reaction. List of Key Variables: The key variables that could affect my experiment are the temperature at which the water is, a thermometer will be used and if the temperature rises or falls we will need to restart because this could affect the whole experiment. ...read more.

Middle

Prediction and Hypothesis: In this experiment we will be investigating whether or not the light intensity will change the rate of photosynthesis in Canadian pondweed. We will be doing this by seeing the rate at which oxygen bubbles are produced, because when photosynthesizing the Canadian pondweed produces bubbles and we can see the rate of bubbles against light intensity. The further the light away from the pondweed the less the light intensity, so the less the amount of bubbles produced, as shown in the graph below. I think if I double the distance the light is away from the pondweed. Then the rate at which the bubbles are produced will half because they are directly proportional to each other because the pondweed produces the bubbles when it is photosynthesizing it produces oxygen bubbles so the light = bubbles so the less the amount of light the less the amount of bubbles. BUBBLE RATE LAMP DISTANCE AWAY FROM PONDWEED [image003.gif] BUBBLE RATE [image005.gif] LIGHT INTENSITY Observations: We will be observing how many bubbles are produced against the light intensity then recording the results onto a table. ...read more.

Conclusion

Set up apparatus as above. 2) Fill the test-tube with pond water, and then in the large beaker of cold water. 3) Insert a thermometer into the beaker, and record the temperature at the beginning and end of each experiment, merely as a precaution against a significant rise in temperature, which is not expected. 4) Set up a lamp at a set distance from the plant, ensuring that this distance is from the filament of the lamp to the actual pondweed, rather than the edge of the beaker. 5) The light intensity was measured in the same way as described in the preliminary experiment, and assumed to be the same at any point at any particular distance. 6) When bubbles are being produced at a steady rate, clear any previous bubbles from the tubing by moving the syringe. 7) Start the stopwatch, and wait for 1 minute. 8) Move the bubbles, which have been collected at the bend in the tubing to the part of the tube with a scale. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Green Plants as Organisms section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Green Plants as Organisms essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    An investigation into the effect of light intensity on the rate of photosynthesis of ...

    5 star(s)

    If I use a land plant, I will not be able to tell how much oxygen has been produced. So I will not be able to find out the rate of photosynthesis. Also if I use a land plant, water will likely to be a limiting factor as if the soil is not wet enough.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    An investigation into the effect of a germination inhibitor on the germination of seeds.

    3 star(s)

    2 E 41.2 35.6 0.05 15.2 19 19 x2 = ? D2 = 41.2 + 35.6 + 0.05 + 15.2 + 19 + 19 = 130.1 E This is an even higher number than Day 1's figure, this is

  1. The effect of light intensity on the rate of photosynthesis

    The green pigment chlorophyll is held in small disc-like shapes, made from specialized parts of the cytoplasm, called chloroplasts. The central part of the cell is a vacuole containing cell sap, which is mainly water. The cytoplasm is surrounded by a cell- surface membrane. A nuclear envelope surrounds the nucleus.

  2. Investigating the effect of temperature on the rate of photosynthesis

    Water tub 1 Larger volume of water than a beaker, therefore changing temperature less easily. Thermometer (accurate to 1oC) 1 To make sure the water is of the correct temperature. Light intensity meter (1-10) (not very accurate as lever fluctuates)

  1. How temperature affects the rate of photosynthesis.

    The line of best fit shows that as the temperature is raised from 0 oC to 15 oC the average rate of oxygen production increases from 0.5 mm3/min to 47.5 mm3/min. So it can be concluded that as the temperature increase from 0 oC to 35 oC, so does the

  2. An experiment to investigate the effect of Light intensity on the rate of photosynthesis.

    Also, the temperature of the water around the plant needs to be kept the same. This should give the chlorophyll the optimum conditions at which it can convert the light into energy and therefore make the plant produce the most oxygen.

  1. Investigate the effect of light intensity on the rate of photosynthesis in an aquatic ...

    within Alternatively for the measuring volume of oxygen given off experiment * A test tube: Large enough to cover the spout of the funnel Diagram b: Preliminary Investigation & Results obtained I also set other guidelines of the kinds above during my preliminary investigation, which would be the basis of my final experiment.

  2. An Investigation into Species Diversity with distance along a Pingo.

    In effect it will reduce the species diversity of an area. Where the soil is thin and water scarce, the vegetation will adapt to reduce water loss by transpiration. Transpiration occurs from the plant leaves to the air. The walls of the mesophyll are wet; some of this water evaporates

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work