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An investigation of one factor which affects the rate of reaction between Sodium Thiosulphate solution and hydrochloric acid.

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Introduction

Steven Mavrou-St. Edmunds School-61423 An investigation of one factor which affects the rate of reaction between Sodium Thiosulphate solution and hydrochloric acid. Na2 S2 O3 (aq) + 2HCl (aq) = 2NaCl(aq) + S(s) + SO2(g) + H2O(l) Introduction: Sodium Thiosulphate solution is a colourless solution and hydrochloric acid is also a colourless solution. When mixed together and then shaken, the solution gets cloudy until it becomes a pale yellow colour and you cant see through the solution. In this assessment I have been asked to investigate one factor which affects the rate of reaction between Sodium Thiosulphate solution and Hydrochloric acid. I will do this by putting a cross underneath my beaker and time how long it takes until I cannot see through the mixed solution. In my investigation I will use my knowledge on the theories of collision and kinetic. I will also use my knowledge on Activation energy and heat energy. Collision theory It is the theory used to predict the rates of chemical reactions, particularly for gases. The collision theory is based on the assumption that for a reaction to occur it is necessary for the reacting atoms or molecules to come together or collide with one another. ...read more.

Middle

4.Measure out amount of distilled water needed into a measuring cylinder. 5.Add distilled water into the sodium thiosulphate. 6.Measure out needed amount of hydrochloric acid into a different measuring cylinder. 7.Place 100cm3 conical flask directly above a piece of paper with a cross on it. 8.Have a stopwatch ready for use. 9.Add the hydrochloric acid to the sodium thiosulphate and distilled water solution. 10.Press start on your stopwatch. 11.Stir the mixed solution at a steady speed until you cannot see the cross through the solution. 12.When you cannot see through the solution press stop on the stopwatch and record your answer. 13.Pour the solution down a fume cupboard and rinse and clean the conical flask so it is fit for use for the next experiment. 14. Now repeat the experiment 5 times. List of Equipment 1. 100cm conical flask 2. 50cm measuring cylinder 3. 25cm measuring cylinder 4. Stopwatch 5. Thermometer 6. Dropping pipette 7. A cross on a piece of paper 8. 1.0 M hydrochloric acid 9. 40g/l sodium thiosulphate 10. Distilled water 11. Fume cupboard for waste products. 12. Safety glasses 13. Lab coat Prediction In my experiment I predict that when I increase the concentration of sodium thiosulphate the rate of reaction will also increase. ...read more.

Conclusion

I would investigate this to see what results I may get by changing a different factor. I would change the concentration of the hydrochloric acid and change the amount of water accordingly and I would keep the amount of sodium thiosulphate the same. Whilst doing all this I would keep the total amount of solution the same throughout. This is a table to show how I would do this experiment AmountofHydrochloricAcid(cm3) 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 AmountofWater (cm3) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 AmountofSodiumThiosulphate(cm3) 10 10 10 1 10 10 10 TotalAmountofSolution(cm3) 50 50 50 50 50 50 50 I predict that by increasing the hydrochloric acid the rate of reaction will decrease. When I double the amount of hydrochloric acid the number of particles will halve in every cm3. Therefore the amount of collisions will halve per second and therefore the amount of successful collisions will halve, and the rate of reaction will also halve. If I decrease the hydrochloric acid the rate of reaction will increase. When I decrease the amount of hydrochloric acid the rate of reaction will increase. When I halve the amount of hydrochloric acid the number of particles will double in every cm3. Therefore the amount of collisions will double per second and therefore the amount of successful collisions will double, and the rate of reaction will also double. ...read more.

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