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An investigation of the factors that affect the rate of respiration in Yeast.

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Introduction

An investigation of the factors that affect the rate of respiration in Yeast. Introduction Yeast is one of the living cells, which can respire aerobically, and anaerobically in this investigation I am just taking into consideration respiration as whole. The equation of respiration in yeast is: Equation: There are different variables in this experiment. These consist of the range in temperature, concentration of glucose, amount of hydrogen carbonate solution used and amount of water used for the water bath. These variables are important and affect the way in which yeast respires. I shall be choosing the range in temperature as the variable to study to see if it affects the rate of respiration. Prediction In this experiment the temperature shall affect the way in which yeast respires. I predict that the temperature at which the rate of reaction shall be fastest is at higher temperatures but below 50�C. This is because enzymes work best at the higher temperatures. If the temperature is above around 50�C enzymes break down and stop working causing for respiration not to take place. However if the temperature is less than around 30�C it shall mean that the enzymes work slower and therefore the reactions will be slower and the energy produced by respiration shall decrease. ...read more.

Middle

Which is used to compare the indicator solution used in the experiment. 3. 20cm� of yeast will then be poured into a boiling tube and then 10cm� of glucose solution will then be poured into this same boiling tube. 4. The stop clock will then be started to allow the glucose and yeast to calibrate for 10 minutes. 5. A 200cm� beaker will be filled with water. 100cm� of water from the tap and then another 100cm� of boiling water from the kettle. 6. The temperature of the water will then be taken using a thermometer. 7. After that various amounts of water will be taken out of the beaker using a syringe to then be replaced by cold water to allow the water to reach the exact temperature needed for the experiment being conducted. 8. The glucose and yeast solution will then be placed into the water bath, which will have been set at a specific temperature. 9. A delivery tube will then be placed on the boiling tube containing the glucose and yeast solution. The tip of the tube will then be placed 1cm below the Damascus of the water to allow the carbon dioxide to produce effervescence in the test tube containing hydrogen carbonate solution. ...read more.

Conclusion

This was due to the fact that as the temperature became too hot the enzymes in the yeast cell become denatured and cause the reactions to be nonexistent. I found that the results of my experiment agreed with all the information that I had gathered this being that the enzymes would work at higher temperatures. In my experiment I noticed that at 19�C the cell did not seem to be respiring at all. I left the yeast cell in the 19�C for almost 30 minutes for the hydrogen carbonate solution to change its colouration. Then, as I increased the temperature of the water bath, so to did the rate of reaction and this agrees with the graph of rate of reaction below. This deduction can be made due to the fact that as the enzymes reach the optimum temperature the rate of reaction is grates although once this range of temperatures had been exceeded (from around 35�C to 45�C) the rate of reaction has a rapid decline until around the enzymes then become denature which is around 60�C. Results Table Temperature of water Bath in �C Minutes taken in 1st Experiment Minutes taken in Experiment Minutes taken in Experiment Average time taken Experiments 55 25 22 27 25 45 9 12 13 11 37 4 6 7 6 29 17 15 20 17 19 29 30 29 29 Jason Carboo First Draft 5/8/2007 ...read more.

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