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An Investigation to See What Effects the Neutralisation of Acids by Antacids

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Introduction

An Investigation to See What Effects the Neutralisation of Acids by Antacids In this experiment I will be looking at what affects the rate of reaction in a chemical reaction between Hydrochloric acid and commercial antacids. I will be looking at one of the Rates of reaction, surface area, to see if a smaller surface area does speed up a reaction. The reason that I became interested in this experiment is that I have been suffering from terrible indigestion of late and was wondering what would affect the efficiency of the tablets. Indigestion is a common condition caused by excess (or too strong) acid in the stomach, using antacids, usually a salt containing either an earth or alkali metal, always a base, neutralises the acid in the stomach relieving pain. In chemical reactions atoms are rearranged. This rearrangement (and the reaction) is caused by the collision of atoms. In gases and liquids, contact with solids and with each other millions of collisions occur very second. ...read more.

Middle

I found that 0.25M acid works best through some preliminary work. 3. a) When using the two smaller sizes I added 15mls of the water to the powder so I didn't loose any reactants. b) When using larger surface area I just broke the tablets into their respective sizes. 4. I added the hydrochloric acid solution into the side arm tube and measured (in mls) how much was released by seeing how much water was displaced from the measuring tube. My results were as followed: My results contain one anomalous result. This occurs in the fifth minute of the 1/4 tablet experiment. It was more likely to have occurred by human error than contamination because the control was negative and it occurs half way through the test, not from the start. This graph shows the reaction between 0.25m hydrochloric acid and Rennie antacid tablets. As you can see the reaction starts at a steady speed and slows down as the reaction progresses. ...read more.

Conclusion

I believe that contamination would have affected the whole test, and it would have stood out form the other results, having either a faster or slower reaction rate than the others. The best place to test the tablet would be in the stomach, as this is where the tablets are designed to work, it would be interesting to see if the enzymes in the stomach aid or slow down the reaction, although I think it would make little difference as the enzyme present in the stomach, protease, is designed to break down protein into amino acids, thus would do little to catalyse the neutralisation of stomach acid. To obtain results closer to those which would occur in the stomach, the experiment would have to take place at 32�c. I would expect the reaction to occur at a faster rate, because the particles would be moving faster (this point is explained in further detail earlier in this report). The best way to obtain results similar to those that would occur in the stomach would be a computer simulation, this way I could set the testing environment how I wanted without having to obtain a stomach. ...read more.

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