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An investigation to show how we can change the rate of the reaction between magnesium and hydrochloric acid.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

An investigation to show how we can change the rate of the reaction between magnesium and hydrochloric acid. Planning During my science lessons I have learnt the following information that has enabled me to plan my investigation. As a substance becomes less concentrated there are less particles of that substance in a given space. The greater the concentration of particles the greater the chance they have of colliding with each other. When particles of magnesium and hydrochloric acid collide they can either bounce apart or react to form a new substance. If they collide more often they will react more often. Therefore decreasing the concentration of hydrochloric acid decreases the rate of the reaction. Prediction On the basis of my research, I predict that as you change the concentration it will affect the rate of the reaction. So the greater the concentration of particles the greater the rate of the reaction will be. The lower the concentration of particles the lower the rate of the reaction which will result to a slow reaction. ...read more.

Middle

My results confirm my original prediction which was the greater the concentration the greater the rate of reaction will be and the lower the concentration the lower the rate of reaction will be. Looking at my results I can see that collision theory takes place as well, which made the results come out the way they did. The greater the concentration the greater the chance the magnesium and acid have of colliding with each other. When particles of acid and magnesium collide they either bounce apart or they react to form a new substance. Collision theory explains how chemical reactions occur, and why rates of reactions differ. For a reaction to occur, particles must collide. If the collision causes a chemical change, it is referred to as a fruitful collision. Only a certain fraction of the total collisions cause chemical change: these are called successful collisions. The successful collisions have sufficient energy (activation energy. I have explained this in planning 2) ...read more.

Conclusion

Firstly, I think that the magnesium should have been weighed on a very accurate balance which wasn't available. Secondly I think that the magnesium should be cleaned using emery paper so it can remove corrosion. Finally I think that the experiment could be repeated again by another method, probably using a balance to measure the mass of gas given off each 30 seconds. This will produce a higher quality and accurate experiment. Planning 2 Activation Energy. Activation energy in chemistry is the minimum energy needed to cause a reaction. A chemical reaction between two substances occurs only when a particle of one collides with a particle of the other. When they collide they may form a product whose chemical energy is higher than the combined chemical energy of the reactants. In order for this state in the reaction to be achieved some of the energy must enter into the reaction other than the chemical energy. This energy is activation energy. In gases, liquids and in solution, the particles move at different speeds, some move very slow and some move very fast. Particles must collide with enough energy to react. ...read more.

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