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Analysis of anaemia.

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Introduction

Anaemia Problem Anaemia is a condition resulting from below- normal levels of haemoglobin in the red blood cells. Haemoglobin in the blood is responsible for carrying oxygen to the rest of the body. Anaemia may be due to loss of blood from heavy menstrual periods, from internal bleeding caused by a peptic ulcer, or from haemorrhoids. A healthy person whose diet contains plenty of iron and vitamins can produce large amounts of new blood. However, if your diet is inadequate, even small, persistent losses of blood may cause anaemia. ...read more.

Middle

Aplastic anaemia is a rare disease which affects mostly young men. 2 to 6 people per million worldwide develop this disorder annually but it affects mostly people in the Orient. A variety of associations have been made in the attempt to find a specific cause, but no one cause can be identified. Treatment must be given straight away after diagnosis to avoid fatality. Patients treated successfully for anaemia then have a higher risk of developing other diseases later in life, including cancer. Causes Not taking in enough of the required nutrients in diet: * Lack of Vitamin B12 (Pernicious Anaemia) ...read more.

Conclusion

The body still makes red blood cells but they are not made in the normal amount. Treatments The main treatment for anaemia is a bone marrow transplant. This is done to decrease the risk of infection and maintain adequate haemoglobin values. Because survival after is affected by pretransplant transfusions, these are kept to a minimum. If transfusion becomes necessary due to bleeding or symptoms of anaemia, patients must be protected from alloimmunization and the development of antibodies to minor transplant antigens, both of which lead to graft rejection; for this reason, family members should not be the blood product donors. Survival when the donor and recipient are mismatched at two or more loci is only 10-20%. ...read more.

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Response to the question

The response to the question is done very well for gcse standard. To improve the candidate should have gone into greater depth to explain the causes behind the different types of anaemia as the explanations they provided as very basic. ...

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Response to the question

The response to the question is done very well for gcse standard. To improve the candidate should have gone into greater depth to explain the causes behind the different types of anaemia as the explanations they provided as very basic. Overall, a very good clear essay which includes the causes, symptoms and treatment of anaemia.

Level of analysis

The candidate provides concise and clear analysis of the different types and causes of anaemia. The candidate should also consider further the different causes of the different types of anaemia as some of the facts they state need to be explained more. Such as haemolytic anaemia is normally an autoimmune disease but can be caused by different factors. The different types of acquired and inherited anaemias are explained well. The candidate also explains the different treatments to a high standard. The introduction is good and outlines what anaemia is before delving into the different types.

Quality of writing

Punctuation, grammar and spelling are all done to a very high level. The candidate communicates clearly and concisely with clear paragraphing and structure behind the analysis.


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Reviewed by skatealexia 13/07/2012

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