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OCR GCSE Case Study: Is MMR Safe?

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Introduction

Science Case Study Contents Introduction - Page 3 - What is MMR? - What are measles, mumps and rubella? Evidence - Pages 4 to 7 - Evidence to suggest that the MMR vaccine is safe - Evidence to suggest that the MMR vaccine is not safe Conclusion - Page 8 - Comparison - Conclusion Introduction What is the MMR vaccine? The MMR vaccine helps to protect people from three major illnesses: measles, mumps and rubella (otherwise known as German measles). These diseases are all contagious and could, especially measles, be fatal. The vaccination is given to babies thirteen months and above, and then a second time before the child starts school. The vaccination can also be given to adults who have not previously has the vaccination. The MMR vaccine is easier and more cost-effective than having each vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella separately, although in some countries this is the only option. What are measles, mumps and rubella? Measles is probably the worst, most fatal illness out of the three included in the vaccine. ...read more.

Middle

Then, when the MMR vaccine was introduced in 1988 along with measles & rubella campaigns and the second dose of the vaccine being introduced in 1996, the number decreased to zero. Unknown Author (2008). Celebrate Maurice Hilleman's birthday this August 30. Science Notes. Available: http://sciencenotes.wordpress.com/2008/04/04/celebrate-maurice-hillemans-birthday-this-august-30/ This source is quite reliable but not really to an extent where I can trust it as much as I could with an official source. This graph came from an online journal but as the author is unknown, I do not know if these figures are accurately recorded by a doctor or a scientist. However this is still a trustworthy source. Complications Risk after natural disease Risk after first dose of MMR Fits (convulsions) 1 in 200 1 in 1000 Meningitis / encephalitis 1 in 200 to 1 in 5000 1 in 1000000 Conditions affecting the clotting of the blood 1 in 3000 1 in 24000 Severe allergic response (anaphylaxis) - 1 in 100000 Deaths 1 in 8000 to 1 in 10000 (depends on age) 0 Medinfo. (2004). Medinfo: MMR Vaccination. ...read more.

Conclusion

Since the personal opinion I used is only one of a 17-year-old student, it is not as truthful or accurate as it would be if it were the opinion of a scientist or a doctor. In conclusion, I think that the MMR vaccine is safe for babies and young children. I agree with the people who say that it is an essential for children to have the vaccination at a young age, or even adults who have not previously been vaccinated. Although there are very mild side effects from the vaccine, like dizziness or a rash that could last for a couple of days, these are nothing compared to what could happen if you or your child had measles, mumps or rubella. Complications are so much more fatal from the real diseases than ones from having the vaccine. Plus, if parents are thinking about having their children vaccinated against each disease with a separate vaccination for each one, this would mean having six injections; three vaccines and then three boosters. The MMR vaccine means having only two injections rather than six, making it more cost-effective and efficient. ?? ?? ?? ?? 1 ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

3 star(s)

***A sound report which is clearly trying to look critically at the sources of information for this issue and presents a reasonably balanced viewpoint.
To improve
Try to differentiate between primary and secondary sources.
In the Sciences, primary sources are documents that provide full description of the original research. For example, a primary source would be a journal article where scientists describe their research on the vaccine. A secondary source would be an article commenting or analyzing the scientists' research on the effects of the vaccine.
Read through your selected sources carefully and remember even scientists and doctors may have personal viewpoints that may bias their interpretation of results, which is why it is important to have work reviewed by other scientists.

Marked by teacher Stevie Fleming 03/01/2013

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