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Catalase activity in the liver

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

* NAME: JOE TROIANO FORM: 5B CAND. NUMBER: INTRODUCTION The overall aim of this experiment is to investigate catalase activity in the liver. I will be watching to see what happens to the speed of reaction when the temperature rises. I will also be looking at when the catalase enzymes perform the reaction the quickest and when the catalase performing the reaction slowest (or maybe not at all). Before I took my preliminary experiment I decided to take my experiment at these temperatures 0?C, 10?C, 20?C, 30?C, 40?C, 50?C, 60?C, 70?C and 80?C. I will find out in my preliminary experiment whether to use a test tube or a boiling tube. I will use 1g of liver and 2ml of Hydrogen Peroxide per each test tube. I will heat the experiment using a Bunsen burner and a thermometer to tell me when it is at the temperature I want. I will repeat the experiment 3 times. But after my preliminary I decided to make some changes and here they are- 1) Use a test tube instead of a boiling tube because a boiling tube is too big. 2) I will use a stock solution (this is crushed liver mixed with water) I will use this because it is evenly concentrated. 3) I will use the temperatures 0?C, 10?C, 20?C, 30?C, 40?C, 50?C, 60?C and 70?C I will not use 80?C because by 70?C the enzymes have already disnatured so there is no point in doing 80?C. 4) I will use 2ml of stock solution in each test tube and the amount of hydrogen peroxide will be 1ml. 5) I will repeat the experiment 7 times because this gives me a more accurate average. 6) I will use a water baths at the chosen temperatures to heat the experiment because it is a lot easier to keep it at the wanted temperature. Now after these changes I know how to do this experiment. ...read more.

Middle

Temperature of test ?C Average amount of reaction (mm) 0 53 10 117 20 111 30 115 40 129 50 122 60 87 70 2 EXPLAIN SIMPLY WHAT YOUR RESULTS SHOW From my continuous experiment I have found out that as the temperature increases up to 40?C the rate of reaction increases. For example at 20?C the amount of froth released is 106mm whilst at 30?C the amount of froth released is 115mm this shows an increase of 11mm. But after 40?C the rate of reaction starts to decrease for example at 50?C the amount of froth released is 122mm whilst at 60?C the amount of froth released is 87mm this shows a decrease of 35mm this will be due to the denaturing of the active site. The all or nothing experiment shows that the enzymes are the reason for the reaction. At 70?C the average amount of reaction is 1mm this shows almost no reaction this is because the active sites have denatured. At 40?C the rate of reaction is at it's highest which is 139mm of froth released due to more collisions taking place. The graph shows the rate of reaction increasing then decreasing which looks like a curve. WHAT TREND, PATTERNS OR RELATIONSHIPS CAN YOU SEE IN YOUR RESULTS? Firstly the continuous experiment shows that up to 40?C the rate of reaction increases but after 40?C the rate of reaction decreases. Every 10?C up to 40?C I predicted that the rate of reaction would double but this is not the case in my experiment. From 0?C to 10?C the rate of reaction does double but I am not counting this because I have found out that the readings for 10?C are anomalous. Therefore the average amount of froth for the temperatures from 10?C to 20?C must be anomalous as well. The reason for why the amount of froth at 10?C is anomalous could be due to a few reasons and here they are Firstly the first reason could be due to it is very hard to get the temperature so I probably didn't get the right temperature. ...read more.

Conclusion

Here is a set of results from this experiment. For 25?C Concentration dilution Height of froth 1 (mm) Height of froth 2 (mm) Height of froth 3 (mm) Average (mm) 1 120 130 110 120 1\2 110 100 90 100 1\4 90 80 80 83 1\8 30 40 70 35 1\16 20 20 30 23 For 40?C Concentration dilution Height of froth 1 (mm) Height of froth 2 (mm) Height of froth 3 (mm) Average (mm) 1 140 150 140 143 1\2 130 120 110 120 1\4 100 100 90 96 1\8 70 60 60 63 1\16 50 40 30 40 These results agree with my prediction for example in the experiment at 25?C the catalase enzyme at 1 has an average amount of froth released is 120mm whilst at 1/16 the average amount of froth is 23mm you can see it decreasing. At 40?C the catalase enzyme at 1 has an average amount of froth released is 143mm whilst at 1/16 the average amount froth released is 40mm this proves my prediction correct. This is because at the same concentration 40?C has larger reactions. From this experiment I have learned that the concentration is a major factor in the amount of reaction that takes place but the temperature can increase reaction even further. If I done more in this experiment I would expect to see a graph like this. This graph shows - the first increase of reaction shows the concentration increasing then the vertical part shows when the concentration can't increase the rate of reaction any further the second increase of reaction shows what happens when you increase the temperature then the second vertical part shows when the temperature can't make the rate of reaction any further (the graph would start to go down if temperature goes over 40?C). From this experiment I have came to a solid statement that if you increase the concentration you increase the rate of reaction. ...read more.

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