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charles law

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Introduction

Joanne Barton                                                                                                 13/12/2007

Physics practical report 2

Oscillations and frequency of wood and plastic metre rules

Abstract

An experiment was carried out to show how oscillations occur relating to a wood and plastic metre rule and how frequency can be calculated from the results. This experiment involved the timing of oscillations when oscillating meter rules suspended from a bench, the results found that the wood metre rule has a higher frequency then that of the plastic meter rule due to the stiffness (material) of the wood.

Materials

  • Wood meter rule
  • Plastic meter rule
  • Load (two 100g mass)
  • G- clamp
  • Stop clock
  • Elastic band
  • Pen and paper

Method

The apparatus were set up as shown above, firstly the two 100g masses where fix firmly to the end of the wood metre rule with the elastic band with their centres of gravity positioned at the 99cm mark. The wood meter rule was then clamped to the edge of the bench with the G-clamp so that the distance of the edge of the bench and the centre of the mass was 0.9m. The meter rule was then depressed by the free end a small distance roughly 0.1m to 0.

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Middle

0.3

3.33

10

0.6

2.48

2.39

2.44

0.24

4.17

10

0.55

1.94

1.82

1.88

0.18

5.56

10

0.5

1.61

1.76

1.69

0.16

6.25

10

0.45

1.43

1.52

1.48

0.14

7.14

10

0.4

0.94

0.87

0.91

0.09

11.11

10

0.35

0.53

0.59

0.56

0.06

16.67

From table 1 you can see that when the length increases the periodic time increases therefore the frequency decreases.

Table 2

This table shows oscillation, length, time, periodic time and frequency for a plastic meter rule.

Oscillation

length(m)

1st time(s)

2nd time(s)

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Conclusion

The results obtained were not as accurate as they could have been, when the oscillation becomes greater it was difficult to start and stop the stop clock and count 10 oscillations as it was going so fast, therefore the last results are not as accurate as the first. Also it is said that when timing oscillations there is a time delay of 0.1 – 0.2 seconds between visual signals detected by the eye and the brain making a decision, and the muscles moving into action. Anticipation could add another factor as it was to tempting to stop the clock before you got to 10 oscillations.  

An example of oscillations referring to musical instruments is the strings and air columns of a musical instrument when producing a note. Sound waves are transmitted by the oscillation of the particles of the medium in which the sound is travelling. Atoms in a solid vibrate about fixed positions of their lattice. The pipe-organ, pan-pipes and whistle use a steady flow of air to create pure tones.

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