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Chemical reactions of the elements - Reaction of titanium with air.

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Introduction

Chemical reactions of the elements Reaction of titanium with air Titanium metal is coated with an oxide layer that usually renders it inactive. However once titanium starts to burn in air it burns with a spectacular white flame to form titanium dioxide, TiO2 and titanium nitride, TiN. Titanium metal even burns in pure nitrogen to form titanium nitride. Ti(s) + O2(g) TiO2(s) 2Ti(s) + N2(g) TiN(s) Reaction of titanium with water Titanium metal is coated with an oxide layer that usually renders it inactive. However, titanium will react with steam form the dioxide, titanium(IV) oxide, TiO2, and hydrogen, H2. ...read more.

Middle

+ 2I2(g) TiI4(s) [dark brown] Reaction of titanium with acids Dilute aqueous hydrofluoric acid, HF, reacts with titanium to form the complex anion [TiF6]3- together with hydrogen, H2. 2Ti(s) + 12HF(aq) 2[TiF6]3-(aq) + 3H2(g) + 6H+(aq) Titanium metal does not react with mineral acids at ambient temperature but does react with hot hydrochloric acic to form titanium(III) complexes. Reaction of titanium with bases Titanium does not appear to react wih alkalis under normal conditions, even when hot. Uses The following uses for titanium are gathered from a number of sources as well as from anecdotal comments. I'd be delighted to receive corrections as well as additional referenced uses (please use the feedback mechanism to add uses). ...read more.

Conclusion

It has excellent resistance to sea water and is used for propeller shafts, rigging, and other parts of ships exposed to salt water. A titanium anode coated with platinum provides cathodic protection from corrosion by salt water. Titanium paint is an excellent reflector of infrared radiation, and is extensively used in solar observatories where heat causes poor viewing conditions. Pure titanium dioxide is relatively clear and has an extremely high index of refraction with an optical dispersion higher than diamond. It is produced artificially for use as a gemstone, but it is relatively soft. Star sapphires and rubies exhibit their asterism as a result of the presence of TiO2. The dioxide is used extensively for paint as it is permanent and has good covering power. Titanium oxide pigment accounts for the largest use of the element. ...read more.

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