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How the Concentration of Sodium Thiosulphate affects the Rate of Reaction

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Introduction

Rate of Reaction Coursework By Bonnie Kingett Contents Aim....................................................................................................................2 Introduction.......................................................................................................2 Preliminary Plan................................................................................................2 Preliminary Results...........................................................................................3 Safety................................................................................................................4 Fair Test............................................................................................................4 Method..............................................................................................................5 Results..............................................................................................................5 Conclusion........................................................................................................7 Evaluation.........................................................................................................8 Aim: The aim of our investigation was to find out how the rate of reaction between Sodium Thiosulphate and Hydrochloric Acid is affected by varying the concentration. Introduction: The rate of reaction is the rate of loss of a reactant or the rate of development of a product during a chemical reaction. It is measured by dividing 1,000 by the time taken for the reaction to take place. There are five factors which affect the rate of a reaction, according to the collision theory of reacting particles: temperature, concentration (of solution), pressure (in gases), surface area (of solids), and catalysts. We have chosen to investigate the effect of concentration on the rate of reaction. This is because it is the most practical to investigate. Dealing with temperatures is a difficult task, especially when we have to keep constant high temperatures. Secondly the rate equation and the constant k changes when the temperature of the reaction changes. We have no gases and solids involved therefore it is easy to deal with solutions. Similarly the use of a catalyst complicates things, and if used incorrectly could alter the outcome of the experiment. ...read more.

Middle

We must make sure that coats and bags are all out of the way while doing the experiment. Ties and hair should be tucked out of the way, so they do not make contact with any of the chemicals. It would also be preferable to wear a scientific apron, however this is not essential. We should also try our best not to spill any chemicals, and we must not eat or drink in the lab while dealing with these harmful chemicals, as they can get on to our hands. Fair Test To make this experiment a fair test, we need to make sure we do a number of things. In this experiment we are trying to find the rate of reaction using concentration as a factor, so there is a number of things we need to make sure we do to keep it a fair test. Firstly, we need to keep a chemical at a constant concentration. So, in this experiment we have chosen to keep hydrochloric acid at a constant concentration (5cm3). We could have, however, used Sodium Thiosulphate as a constant, but we had chosen to use Hydrochloric acid. Next we must make sure that the solution is kept at a constant volume throughout the experiment. ...read more.

Conclusion

We then added 50cm3 of Sodium Thiosulphate, also measured using a burette, to the hydrochloric acid, and at this time we do not need to add any water. Immediately, we started the stopwatch. We then waited for the black cross to disappear. When it had become too cloudy to distinguish its whereabouts, we stopped the stopwatch. Then we recorded what the time was. We then emptied out the contents of the beaker, cleaned it out and dried it out to ensure that none of the reactants were still present. Next, we added 40cm3 of Sodium Thiosulphate; we kept the HCL acid constantly at 5cm3. Because we have to keep the volume the same for it to be a fair test, we added 5cm3 of water (we had to add the Sodium Thiosulphate and the water at the same time for this to be a fair test). We then recorded the time for the cross to become completely obscured. We repeated this many times, adding different amounts of Sodium Thiosulphate and water each time, and recording the time taken each time. To ensure that our results were relatively accurate, the same person took the measurements each time. Evaluation Since we took enough results to draw a conclusion, I think that ours was fairly accurate. We used a burette for measuring ?? ?? ?? ?? Bonnie Kingett 10tdC1 Page 1 22/02/2010 ...read more.

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This report has a very good introduction and a detailed, if poorly laid out method. However, there is no conclusion and the evaluation is very poor

Overall, this piece of work is 2 stars out of 5

Marked by teacher Brady Smith 10/04/2013

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