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Combining Magnesium and Oxygen

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Introduction

Combining Magnesium and Oxygen Purpose: The purpose of this experiment is to show that magnesium and oxygen combine in a definite whole- number ratio by mass, by using mass relationships. Data and Observations: a. Mass of empty crucible 11.8g b. Mass of crucible + Mg 12.35g c. Mass of crucible + oxide 13.11g d. Odor of vapor in step 6: The odor was similar to that of burning plastic. Calculations: 1. Mass of magnesium used: 0.55g 2. Mass of oxygen that reacted: 0.76g 3. Number of moles of Mg used: 0.023 mol 4. Number of moles of O that reacted: 0.048 mol 5. Ratio of moles of Mg to moles of O: MgO2 (1:2) Questions: 1. The empirical formula of magnesium oxide is MgO2. 2. The ratio of the mass in grams of magnesium used to the mass in grams of oxygen that reacted is 3 to 4 (3:4). The law of definite proportions states that specific substances always contain elements in the same ratio by mass. Therefore magnesium oxide will always contain a ratio of 3:4 by mass in grams. ...read more.

Middle

5. The empirical formula of hydrogen peroxide is HO. 6. The chemical composition of carbon monoxide, CO, is similar to that of carbon dioxide, CO2, because both compositions are made up of the same elements: carbon and oxygen. Although the compositions are different because their empirical formulas are different; carbon monoxide has one carbon and one oxygen, whereas as carbon dioxide has one carbon and two oxygens. 7. The empirical formula of a compound having a 3.20g mass, with 1.28g of sulfur and 1.92g of oxygen, is SO3 ( sulfite). Conclusion: 1. Procedure: First clean a crucible and a lid. Dry them by heating them in the hottest part of the burner's flame for three minutes. Then allow the crucible and lid to cool. Now measure the mass of just the crucible and record this measurement as (a) under "Observations and Data". Next place 0.5g of magnesium turnings in the crucible and measure the mass of the crucible and its contents, record this measurement as (b). Then cover the crucible and place it in a clay triangle. Heat the crucible gently for two minutes. ...read more.

Conclusion

The heated crucible resulted in a vapor that had an odor of burning plastic. 3. I learned from this lab how to set up mass ratios and how they relate to the Law of Definite Proportions. I also learned how to convert grams into moles and moles into molecules, atoms, and ions. I also learned how to determine the empirical formula of a compound and how to obtain gram atomic masses. Discussion: 1. Sources of Error: One source of error may have been when we reheated the magnesium and let it heat for too long. The mass of the magnesium may have differed if it had not been heated as long as it was. Another source of error may have been when we remassed the magnesium before letting it cool completely. If it had more time to cool, the mass could have been less. 2. Lab Skills: In this lab I learned how to properly hold a crucible and a crucible lid with crucible tongs. I also learned how to use a clay triangle when heating a crucible. I also became more familiar with the Bunsen burner and how to use it when heating a substance "gently" compared to heating a substance "strongly." ...read more.

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