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Comparing the concentration of Vitamin C in a fresh fruit versus its carton juice

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Introduction

Comparing the concentration of Vitamin C in a fresh fruit versus its carton juice Introduction: This coursework aims to compare the concentration of Vitamin C in fresh fruit versus its carton juice. Background Information: Vitamins are a range of substances required for good health. They have an effect on many bodily functions and are needed in small quantities for normal health. They are usually separated into water-soluble (Vitamins B and C) and fat-soluble (Vitamins A, D, E and K) groups. This investigation focuses on Vitamin C. Hypothesis: I hypothesise that fresh fruit will have a higher concentration of Vitamin C than its carton juice. I may possibly find that citrus fruits will have a greater concentration of Vitamin C than non-citrus fruits. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is a water-soluble vitamin. Water-soluble vitamins are readily excreted in urine and so they have to be consumed regularly. Vitamin C is said to act as an electron carrier in respiration. It stimulates the synthesis of collagen fibres. Vitamin C enhances absorption of iron from vegetables. Lack of Vitamin C causes scurvy. The symptoms of scurvy are bleeding of gums and loosening of teeth due to loss of action of collagen and haemorrhages. Other symptoms include the breakdown of connective tissue and blood vessels, internal bleeding in tissues. High daily consumption of Vitamin C may have many beneficial effects, including the reduction of blood cholesterol and prevention of colds. ...read more.

Middle

This was the control of the experiment. Then fresh fruit juices were made - orange, lemon, pear and grapefruit juices. These juices were made by freshly squeezing the fresh fruits. The same experiment was done, tested with DCPIP. The results were compared to that of the control experiment and the concentration of Vitamin C in the fresh fruit was determined. E.g. the volume of fresh orange juice needed to reduce the DCPIP was 11.6cm�. The control experiment showed that the volume of 1.6mg/cm� Vitamin C needed to reduce the DCPIP was 11.4cm� and the volume of 1.4mg/cm� Vitamin C needed to reduce DCPIP was 12.4. This shows that the concentration of Vitamin C in the fresh orange must be between 1.6 and 1.4mg/cm�. Carton juices were then used in the place of Vitamin C and fresh fruit juice. The results were compared to that of the control experiment and the concentration of Vitamin C in the carton juice was determined. The comparisons were done in the same way as the results of the fresh fruit juices were compared to the control experiment results. Results: TABLE 1: Control Experiment Volume of Vitamin C needed to reduce the DCPIP and turn it colourless Concentration of Vitamin C (mg/cm�) Volume of Vitamin C needed for DCPIP to turn colourless (cm�) 2.0 mg/cm� 7.8 1.8 mg/cm� 10.2 1.6 mg/cm� 11.4 1.4 mg/cm� 12.4 1.2 mg/cm� 13.1 1.0 mg/cm� 13.7 0.8 mg/cm� 14.4 0.6 mg/cm� 15.9 0.4 mg/cm� 18.7 0.2 mg/cm� 25.0 TABLE ...read more.

Conclusion

Another way I could have found out the concentration of Vitamin C in the pear would have been to continue adding juice to the DCPIP in a 250cm� beaker, so I would have been able to continue adding juice until the beaker was full. If the beaker had filled up to 250cm�, it would have shown that the concentration of the DCPIP was too high. This investigation could have been improved by doing repeats of the experiments. This would have given more accurate results. The mean of the readings could have been used to plot graphs and explain the results. I only did one reading of each juice, which could have given me inaccurate results. It may be that lemons have a higher concentration of Vitamin C than oranges and grapefruits have a higher concentration of Vitamin C than lemons. Also, a wider range of concentrations of Vitamin C could have been used in the control experiment. This would have given more accurate results overall. I may have been able to give a more precise result as to the concentration of Vitamin C in the juices. I had expanded the range of the solutions. I had planned to use only 4 different concentrations but then I realised that I needed a wider range and used 10 different solutions. A wider variety of fruits could have been used as well. I could have used apples, bananas, plums, grapes and other non-citrus fruits to give me a greater number of results to compare the citrus fruits with non-citrus fruits. ...read more.

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