• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Conservation of Momentum

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Conservation of Momentum Experiment 5 was the study of the conservation of momentum. By this principle, the total initial momentum of an event should be equal in magnitude to the total final momentum of an event. The experiment studies the collision of elastic, inelastic, and an explosion event at different masses to test the conservation of momentum. Event 1: Event one was an elastic collision of equal masses with one in motion and the other rest. Ideally, in such a collision the moving mass should have some velocity while the resting mass has none. After collision, the mass that was in motion should come to rest and the other should continue to move with a velocity equal in magnitude and direction. The event was relatively successful with an error of 6.49%. The error could be attributed to the mass that was supposed to be at rest was not at complete rest. This may have caused the 6% error. Event 2: Event two was an elastic collision of equal masses with both carts in motion towards one another. ...read more.

Middle

Event 4: Event four was an elastic collision of unequal masses, with the heavier cart in motion and the lighter cart at rest. Ideally, after the collision, the heavier cart should continue in the same direction of travel with a smaller velocity, and the lighter cart should begin to travel with some velocity in the direction of the heavier cart. This event was successful with an error of 3.90%. The error may have come from either friction as explained in event two or some loss of momentum due to a shift in the magnets. Event 5: Event five was an elastic collision of unequal masses, with both carts in motion towards one another. Ideally, after the collision, both carts should travel in the direction of the heavier carts initial velocity but with slower velocity. The error for this event was quite large. The large error may have resulted because improper data points were selected to average the initial velocity of the heavier cart. Event 6: Event six was an inelastic collision of unequal masses, with the heavier cart at rest and the lighter cart in motion. ...read more.

Conclusion

Event 9: Event nine was an explosion of unequal masses. Ideally the heavier mass should travel at a slower velocity than the lighter mass, both would travel in opposite directions. The data graph for this event was improperly done. In lab, the carts did exhibit proper mechanic as expected, however the actual quantitative values are not available. Event 10: Event ten was as inelastic collision of equal masses, both in motion. Ideally, after collision, both masses should come to rest or travel together in the direction of the mass with the larger velocity. Graphically and in practice, the event occurred as expected, however the error for the event was 191%. The cause of this may come from the data points selected to get the average velocity for cart 2 after the collision. Event 11: Event eleven was inelastic collision of unequal masses, both in motion. Ideally, after the collision, both masses should continue together to travel in the initial direction of the heavier cart, but with a slower velocity, or in the direction of the lighter cart if the lighter cart had sufficient velocity. Again graphically and in lab, the event occurred as predicted, however again, the initial values were not collected and a quantitative value is not available. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Forces and Motion section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Forces and Motion essays

  1. Peer reviewed

    Hookes lab

    3 star(s)

    therefore there are anomalies in the results as1 reading has completely gone wrong. Moreover it can be also seen that the spring 1 is more flexible as it does not produce anomaly results. Whereas spring 2 produces anomaly results as it was not very flexible in comparison.

  2. Hookes lab Siddharth Nair

    MODIFICATIONS TO THE EXPERIMENT: > Instead of using one spring, the experiment was carried out using two springs with different elasticity. > The meter rule was held in a straight position by attaching it to the clamp stand. Thus the data could be recorded more efficiently.

  1. Physics Lab - Conservation of momentum

    Measure the distance Cart 2 displaced after collision with Cart 1 and the time taken to become stationary again. 6. Measure the distance and direction displaced by Cart 1 after collision and the time taken for it to come to rest.

  2. Investigation on ‘The Law of Conservation of Energy’

    I will work out the velocity of the ramp by using a piece of ticker tape attached to the end of the trolley. The distance between the dots, at the point of the end of the ramp, will allow me to work out the velocity at the end of the run.

  1. Observing The Law of Conservation of Momentum

    They were purposely released with different forces so that they would move in any one direction when they collided. When they did collide, they moved off to the right. 2 Stopwatches were started when the trolleys were released. Stopwatch 1 was stopped when the trolleys collided, stopwatch 2 when they stopped moving.

  2. To understand angular momentum easier it is wise to compare it to the less ...

    The shapes that will be focused on (in presentation) are the: hoop of a cylindrical shell, solid cylinder or disk, and the rectangular plane, with formulas: ICM = MR2, ICM = 1/2 MR2 , and ICM = 1/12 M(a2 + b2)

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work