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Decomposing Malachite. Purpose: To test the assumption that a chemical reaction is stoichiometric.

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Introduction

Investigation 7.1: Decomposing Malachite ________________ Design: Purpose: To test the assumption that a chemical reaction is stoichiometric. Problem: What is the relationship between the chemical amount of malachite and the chemical amount of copper (II) oxide formed through malachite’s decomposition? Hypothesis: If the relationship between the the chemical amounts of malachite and copper (II) oxide are stoichiometric, then it will further prove that all chemical reactions are stoichiometric. Prediction: Equation: Cu(OH)2âCuCO3(s) → 2CuO(s) + CO2(g) + H2O(g) 1 mol → 2 mol 1 mol 1 mol Ratio between Copper (II) oxide and Malachite is 2:1 Variables: Manipulated: Mass of Malachite Responding: Mass of Copper (II) oxide once Malachite has decomposed. Controlled: Temperature Malachite is heated to Time Heated (Until Malachite completely decomposes) ...read more.

Middle

oxide. 7. Use the chemical values to plot a graph representing the relationship between the chemical amounts of malachite and copper (II) oxide. Data collection and processing Mass of Malachite (+/- 0.01g) Chemical amount of malachite (mmol) Mass of copper (II) oxide (+/- 0.02 g) Chemical amount of copper (II) oxide (mmol) 0.75 (+/- 1.3%) 3.39 (+/- 1.41%) 0.60 (+/- 3.33%) 7.5 (+/- 3.34%) 1.00 (+/- 1.00%) 4.52 (+/- 1.08%) 0.71 (+/- 2.82%) 8.9 (+/- 2.9%) 1.25 (+/- 0.80%) 5.65 (+/- 0.88%) 0.86 (+/- 2.33%) 11 (+/- 2.41%) 1.50 (+/- 0.67%) 6.78 (+/- 0.75%) 1.18 (+/- 1.69%) 14.8 (+/- 1.77%) 1.75 (+/- 0.57%) 7.91 (+/- 0.65%) 1.25 (+/- 1.6%) 15.7 (+/- 1.68%) ...read more.

Conclusion

Since the values are so close, the experiment proves that all chemical reactions are stoichiometric. One limitation during the experiment was that the stirring rod may collect parts of malachite (or copper (II) oxide) while mixing. This may reduce the final mass of copper (II) oxide when measured, and furthermore affect the scale. This could be corrected by measuring the mass of the stirring rod with the rest of the lab equipment, and then taking the mass away to find the mass of copper (II) oxide. Another limitation is that the malachite was not completely contained while the reaction occurred, and some may have spilled out during the reaction or due to mixing. One was to contain this is to seal the malachite in a flask with a neck so it is harder for the malachite to spill out. Overall however this seemed like a fairly reliable experiment. ...read more.

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