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Describe examples of adaptations to the environment shown by organisms within the ecosystem.

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Introduction

´╗┐Science Biology : assignment 2 : Describe examples of adaptations to the environment shown by organisms within the ecosystem ? Rabbits : They are small, flexible, and fast-moving. Their size helps them stay underground and in small bushes or other spaces as such. They are very flexible, which helps them run, avoid enemies, and hide. They also have very large feet that let them hop long distances and run. so they are more easily adapted to there in environment . Living organisms cannot live isolated from their non-living environment. Living and the non-living environment interact with each other to form a stable system. A natural self-sufficient unit of the world comprising a biotic community (living organisms) and its abiotic physic-chemical environment (non-living environment) is known as an ecosystem. The geographic area providing uniform conditions for life is called biotope. (Greek - bios-life; topes - place). An ecosystem has two components, the physical part or biotope and living part or biotic community. ...read more.

Middle

Because they were able to prosper, they were able to reproduce and pass on those sonar genes to the next generation. There are famous studies of moth evolution in England in the mid 1800's. The Peppered moth has two verities - a light and a dark. As England came into the industrial revolution and was using more and more carbon based energy, more soot was produced. As the soot from the burning of fossil fuels was deposited on building, trees, and various areas, the dark moth was 'selected' and they flourished. This was because they could blend into the darker surroundings better than a light moth could. Conversely, when pollution controls were adopted in England, the amount of soot deposits was reduced and the light moth made a comeback. Some of this study has been question, but the fact of the matter remains that the dark moths flourished in sooty areas and the light moths flourished in cleaner areas. ...read more.

Conclusion

yes it is A habitat is an environment or a place where an animal, plant or person lives and how they survive in that area. For example, a fox will kill its prey, bury it and eat it later. That's how a fox manipulates its habitat and survives. Here are some more examples: A river otter has a long, slender body and lives in burrows hollowed out of riverbanks. It eats fish, insects, birds and small mammals. It can live up to 25 years. It has few enemies, but man is one. It is the largest member of the family, which includes the mink, skunk and weasel. They build dams, this is how they adapt to the environment . what is your name and how are you, where do you come from and why are you hear what is your name why you hear ,what country are you from is your name what is your name what is your name what is you name . ...read more.

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