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Design- Rate of Reaction

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Introduction

Chemistry Laboratory Report To Study the Factors Affecting the Rate of Reaction Design Nikita Bansal B.D.Somani International School Chemistry Standard Level Candidate Number- 002602015 Session: May 2010 AIM To study the factors affecting the rate of reaction RESEARCH QUESTION What is the effect of changing the concentration of sodium thiosulphate by 5cm3 upon the rate of reaction in the reaction between sodium thiosulphate and hydrochloric acid keeping volume of acid, temperature, number of stirs, pressure and surface area constant? BACKGROUND INFORMATION The rate of reaction is often judged by the Collision Theory. This theory created by Max Trautz and William Lewis qualitatively explains how chemical reactions occur and why reaction rates differ for different reactions. This theory is based on the idea that the reactants must collide in order for any reaction to take place. Increasing the concentration of reactants causes an increase in the frequency of collisions, thus increasing the rate of reaction. ...read more.

Middle

Room Temperature (to be kept constant 3. Pressure 4. Surface Area 5. Number of stirs APPARATUS CHEMICALS 1. 0.15 M Sodium Thiosulphate solution (23.7 g Na2S2O3 dissolved in deionized or distilled water to make one liter of solution) 2. 6 M HCl solution (dilute 500 dm3 concentrated HCl solution to one liter with distilled or deionized water) EQUIPMENT 1. 0.250 dm3 beakers 2. Stirring rods 3. 0.025 dm3 graduated cylinder 4. Clock (which can measure in seconds) 5. White Paper 6. Black/Dark coloured marker 6. The level of sodium thiosulphate and hydrochloric acid in the beaker 7. The room temperature and pressure (as these are other factors which affect the rate of reaction.) PROCEDURE 1. Obtain five 0.250 dm3 beakers, about 0.03 dm3 of hydrochloric acid solution, and about 0.080 dm3 of sodium thiosulphate solution. Label the beakers from 1 to 5. Add the amounts of sodium thiosulfate solution and distilled or deionized water to each cup indicated in the following table: Beaker Number Volume of Sodium Thiosulphate(cm3) ...read more.

Conclusion

7. Make a graph of your data by plotting the time (in sec) for each reaction on the y-axis against the volume (in dm3) of sodium thiosulfate stock solution on the x-axis. 8. Calculate the relative rate of each reaction by taking the reciprocal of each time measurement. Record these results in your data table. 9. Make a second graph by plotting the relative rate of each reaction on the y-axis against the volume of sodium thiosulfate solution on the x-axis. PRECAUTIONS 1. Concentrated solution of HC1 will burn skin or damage clothing; avoid skin contact with acid. 2. Reactions should be carried out in a hood or well-ventilated room. 3. Some poisonous SO2(g) is produced. Students should be cautioned against leaning over reaction vessel too closely as they observe the "x" under the beaker. 4. Goggles should be worn throughout the experiment. DATA TABLE Beaker Number Volume of Sodium Thiosuphate(cm3) Volume of Water(cm3) Time taken for reaction to take place(s) 1 25 0.0 2 20 5.0 3 15 10 4 10 15 5 5.0 20 ?? ?? ?? ?? Nikita Bansal BD Somani International School ...read more.

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This is a very well written laboratory report. If complete it would gain high marks. The limiting factor here is that it is incomplete. There are improvements suggested throughout and additional guidance for the missing content.

Marked by teacher Cornelia Bruce 18/04/2013

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