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Determine the solubility of calcium Hydroxide solution with the aid of the titration process

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Introduction

Titration assignement: Aim: The aim of my investigation is to determine the solubility of calcium Hydroxide solution with the aid of the titration process. Titration can be defined as the method of determining the concentration of a substance in solution by adding to it a standard reagent of known concentration in carefully measured amounts until a reaction of definite and known proportion is completed, as shown by a color change or by electrical measurement, and then calculating the unknown concentration. An example could be, a given volume of a solution of unknown acidity may be titrated with a base of known concentration until complete neutralization has occurred. This point is called the equivalence point and is generally determined by observing a color change in an added indicator such as phenolphthalein. From the volume and concentration of added base and the volume of acid solution, the unknown concentration of the solution before titration can be determined. Titrations can also be used to determine the number of acidic or basic groups in an unknown compound. A specific weight of the compound is titrated with a known concentration of acid or base until the equivalence point has been reached. ...read more.

Middle

Will function as the alkali. The target of our experiment is to evaluate the solubility of this compound. Limewater (0.015 mol dm -3) Will be placed into the beaker containing the solid calcium hydroxide. It will function as an indicator and will give us visible proof of when the neutralisation will have reached completion. Graduated Burette Will be containing the hydrochloric acid, and also controlling the amounts of acid falling into the beaker. It is specially built to enable to control the amounts of its content, which exit the burette. This will allow us to measure the amount of hydrochloric acid needed to completely neutralise the calcium hydroxide. 10 cm3 volumetric pipette Will be used to fill up the graduated burette with hydrochloric acid. It is important to transfer the hydrochloric acid from the conical flask to the graduated burette in a safe manner, trying to avoid spllages and most importantly any contact with the body. It also allowes us to accurately and precisely measure the amount of acid that we place into the graduated burette. 100 cm3 conical flask Will be containing the hydrochloric acid before I extract it with the aid of the volumetric pipette. ...read more.

Conclusion

* If spilt in laboratory: wear eye protection, scoop up as much as possible. Add water to the area, followed by mineral absorbent. * If dust inhaled: remove victim to fresh to rest. Seek medical attention if breathing is even slightly affected. * If spilt on skin or clothes: brush off as much solid as possible. Remove contaminated clothing. Flood affected area with large quantities of water. If a large area is affected or blistering occurs, seek medical attention. Non-chemical hazards and precautions to be taken: It is important to arrange the equipment in a way in which there is minimum chance of the equipment being knocked over. Therefore placing the equipment towards the centre of the table is preferable rather than towards the edges. It is important to wear safety spectacles and labcoats throughout the course of the experiment. It is aslo advisable to wear gloves when handling calcium hydroxide. Disposal of residues: Hydrochloric acid - Wear eye protection and gloves. Solutions are best neutralised with sodium carbonate before being disposed of in the fouk water drain with further dilution. Very dilute solutions used in volumetric analysis may be washed away without neutralisation. Calcium hydroxide - Wear eye protection and gloves. Add solid little by little to a large excess of water in a bucket. Leave for one hour before pouring the solution down the foul-water drain. 1 Chemistry coursework 1 ...read more.

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