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Drugs can be extremely harmful. Discuss.

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Introduction

10.12 DRUGS PROJECT SOLVENTS Solvents are fluids which can dissolve things. Some solvents give off vapours which can be harmful if inhaled. Different solvents have different health effects, which will depend on how exposure happens, how much and for how long. Various glues contain solvents that are harmful, if inhaled. When a solvent is sniffed, it produces a 'high' similar to that produced by alcohol. If glue is sniffed on only a few occasions, it is unlikely to cause much harm. But problems will arise if it becomes a habit, and it may lead to sniffing more stronger and more toxic solvents such as aerosol fluid. The feelings caused by inhaling solvents come on very quickly. A lot of sniffing may lead to frightening hallucinations and in severe cases the person may become stupefied and go into a coma. In some cases, inhaling solvents to a large extent may even lead to death. Other effects of inhaling solvents are that they can cause damage to lungs, brain, liver and the kidneys. The fertility of both men and women can be affected and in a pregnant woman, it may even affect the foetus. Some solvents, for example, benzene, can cause cancer. ...read more.

Middle

Drugs impair a person's judgement. They slow down the reaction time, meaning that it takes you longer to respond to a stimulus. Drugs change the chemical processes happening in the body, and this is what leads to dependence and addiction. They are poisonous and can kill cells. Some drugs can cause immediate death or permeate brain damage. Sleeping is harder once doing drugs. Many drugs will increase breathing rate, heart beats per minute and blood pressure. They will make your hair and skin pale in colour. Give you bad breath or stain your teeth. Different drugs have different effects. Most drugs affect the nervous system and the brain. Side effects of cocaine are that they can give you heart attacks even though you are in total shape. Cannabis is a hook- forming drug; once you are hooked to it you crave for more. The effects of heroin are much worse. It can get such a grip on the body that, if the drug is unavailable, the person develops withdrawal symptoms such as dizziness, vomiting and muscle pains. Every time you take drugs, the dosage becomes less and less effective. This results in larger doses every time to get the same (or even less) ...read more.

Conclusion

However, carbon monoxide has an even greater affinity for binding to haemoglobin than oxygen does. This means that the heart of a smoker has to work much harder to get enough oxygen to the brain, heart, muscles and other organs. * Nitrogen oxides - Nitrogen oxides damage the lungs. It is thought that nitrogen oxides are some of the particular chemicals in tobacco smoke that cause the lung disease emphysema. * Hydrogen cyanide - the lungs contain tiny hairs (cilia) that help to 'clean' the lungs by moving foreign substances out. Hydrogen cyanide stops this lung clearance system from working properly, which means the poisonous ingredients of tobacco smoke are allowed to remain inside the lungs. * Ammonia - ammonia is a strong chemical, which also damages the lungs. Long term smoking can cause all types of cancer, such as cancer of the lung, mouth, nose, throat, pancreas, blood, kidney, penis, cervix, bladder and anus. It can also cause lung diseases such as chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema. In pregnant women, the risks of smoking are that there will be a risk of miscarriage, still birth and premature birth. There will also be a lower birth weight of the baby. There will also be an increased risk of ear infections, respiratory illnesses such as asthma, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and childhood cancers such as acute lymphocyte leukaemia. Yusuf Badat 11N ...read more.

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