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Egg albumen experiment.

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Introduction

contents page INTRODUCTION 3 APPARATUS LIST 3 METHOD 4 fig 1: serial dilution table 4 RESULTS 5 Fig 2: results table 5 Fig 3: table of averages 5 Fig 4: graphical representation of the data. 6 DISCUSSION 7 EVALUATION 7 APPENDIX 8 Albumen information 8 The peptide bond 8 Introduction The purpose of this investigation is to establish which is the lowest concentration of Copper (II) Sulphate solution that will denature a sample of egg albumen (egg white) at room temperature. The base of the reaction is the globular protein (albumen) being denatured by a heavy metal (Copper (II)), the copper (II) reacts with the NH3 group causing it to denature, this means the proteins' secondary and tertiary structures are being altered and refolding into different shapes, this resulting in a change from the substance being clear to turning opaque.1 As the concentration of the denaturants increases more folding and changing of shape will occur and therefore more denaturing will occur and at a faster rate. From this I can predict that that lowest concentration of the solution is approximately at 0.03m solution. The reason this is not lower, is that a lower concentration will have little effect on the protein. To conduct this experiment I will dilute the 0.1mol dm -3 using distilled water. The reason for choosing so is that I have found from previous experiments I have conducted during the year (namely food tests- protein with biuretts reagent) ...read more.

Middle

6. Add exactly 2cm3 of the egg albumen from the same into each test tube using a syringe. 7. Evenly mix the solution for 3 minutes and leave to rest for another 6 minutes, after this mix again for 1 minute. Mix each test tube with the same force. 8. Place the solution into the colorimeter and record the result on table 2 9. Repeat procedures 6-9 for each of the concentrations and then repeat each procedure 1-9 three times to obtain more accurate results and place results on table 2. Results Fig 2: results table Concentration of copper (II) sulphate solution, (molar) Initial Transmission of light using colorimeter (%) Final transmission of light using colorimeter (%) % difference of colour i.e., final -initial (%) 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 Once all the data has been collected it can be analysed. I make the information more easily readable with the use of a table of averages. Fig 3: table of averages Concentration of copper (II) sulphate solution, (molar) Average % difference of colour i.e., final -initial (%) 0.00 0.10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 0.90 1.00 From this information I will make a graph, I have incorporated my prediction on the graph. Fig 4: graphical representation of the data. From the graph the lowest concentration of the copper (II) ...read more.

Conclusion

It contains more than half the egg's total protein, niacin, riboflavin, chlorine, magnesium, potassium, sodium and sulphur. The albumen consists of 4 alternating layers of thick and thin consistencies. From the yolk outward, they are designated as the inner thick or chalaziferous white, the inner thin white, the outer thick white and the outer thin white. Egg white tends to thin out as an egg ages because its protein changes in character. The cloudy appearance comes from carbon dioxide. As the egg ages, carbon dioxide escapes, so the albumen of older eggs is more transparent than that of fresher eggs. This is very important for this experiment as it shows the need for the experiment to be conducted several time and averages obtained. This reduces the effect of the eggs age and character of the albumen.3 The peptide bond The illustration below is of example of the peptide bond present within the albumen. The NH3 group is the group which is effected by the heavy metal copper. The copper (II) ions are highly electropositive. They combine with COO- groups and disrupt ionic bonds. This also denatures the protein. 4 Sources 1: biology text book: 'Biology' -Martin Rowland 2: class notes: food test experiments: biurett test 3: internet : http://faculty.clintoncc.suny.edu/faculty/Michael.Gregory/ http://www.georgiaeggs.org/pages/albumen.html' 1 Information obtained from biology rowland book, ref source 1. 2 The prepaority test was obtained from previous class work 'food tests.' 3 Information obtained from 'http://www.georgiaeggs.org/pages/albumen.html' 4 diagram taken from http://faculty.clintoncc.suny.edu/faculty/Michael.Gregory/ Centre number: 12290 Candidate number: 5402 Rizwan Saraf 1 1 ...read more.

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