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Electrolysis Using Copper Sulphate And Copper Electrodes

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Introduction

Electrolysis Using Copper Sulphate And Copper Electrodes Introduction In this experiment copper sulphate will be electrolysed using copper electrodes to find the loss of mass of the anode. The copper anode will be weighed before and after the experiment. Each time the experiment is done the time will be increased by 2.5 minutes until 25 minutes is reached. So the first experiment will last 2.5 minutes and the second 5 minutes. The results will be plotted on a graph of loss of mass against time. Aim To find the loss of mass of anode when electrolysing copper electrodes using copper sulphate solution for different times. Background Information Electrolysis is used to purify copper. Ken Gadd and Steve Gurr state that electrolysis is "the process of decomposition"1. For electrolysis to occur the circuit shown below must be set up: The battery is used to supply the energy for the free electrons inside the wires to move. The wires are in turn used to connect the two electrodes (conducting rods) to the battery. The electrodes are then placed inside the electrolyte (the substance that ions move in), which in this experiment is copper (II) sulphate solution. In industry the impure copper would be used as the anode and the pure copper used as the cathode. ...read more.

Middle

The volume and concentration will be kept the same Prediction The following prediction are made for the electrolysis of copper sulphate using copper electrodes: 1. The anode will dissolve and decrease in mass. This will occur because the copper anode will form copper ions and move towards the cathode causing the anode to become smaller and, therefore, loose mass. 2. The cathode will become larger. This will occur because the copper ions from the anode will be attracted to the cathode. When they gain electrons at the cathode they will become neutral atoms attached to the cathode. This will be especially noticeable towards the end of the experiment as the cathode will be thicker. However, the mass of the cathode will not be measured because not all of the copper ions from the anode will stick firmly onto the cathode so it would be hard to produce accurate results. 3. As the number of coulombs is increased the more mass will be lost. The shape of the graph of loss of mass against number of coulombs will form a straight line from the origin. This will be because there are no other factors affecting the loss of mass so the ratio at which the loss of mass increases will not change. ...read more.

Conclusion

5. The copper anode will be weighed and the mass recorded. 6. This will be repeated and each time the time will increase by two and a half minutes so that the anode will be measured first after two and a half minutes, then five minutes and so on. 7. The results will be plotted on a graph of loss of mass against charge (number of coulombs). The resistance will be found by multiplying the time by the resistance found in the preliminary experiment. Precautions o Wear a laboratory coat to protect your clothing from any spillages. o Keep water away from the circuit to avoid electrocution. If water is spilt turn the switch off before dealing with the water. o Do not short the circuit by there being no resistance such as the copper sulphate or a resistor. o Always turn off the variable resistor before changing the resistance. 1 Chemistry by Ken Gadd and Steve Gurr - first published in 1994 - page 409 2 Complete Chemistry by Rose Marie Gallagher and Paul Ingram - first published 2000 - page 107 3 Chemistry in Context by Graham Hill and John Holman - 4th Edition published 1995 - page 26 4 Complete Chemistry by Rose Marie Gallagher and Paul Ingram - first published 2000 - page 114 Susanna Liniker, Candidate Number 0069 Chemistry Coursework ...read more.

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