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Experiment to investigate the effect of light on the organic plant elodea.

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Introduction

Experiment to investigate the effect of light on the organic plant elodea. Aim: To calculate the rate of photosynthesis from the number of oxygen bubbles produced by the plant. Photosynthesis: The process by which green plants use the sun's energy to build up carbohydrate reserves. Plants make their own organic food such as starch. Plants need Carbon dioxide, water, light and chlorophyll in order to make food; and starch and oxygen are produced. Carbon dioxide and water are the raw materials of photosynthesis. The equation of photosynthesis is: 6CO2 + 6H20 ==> C6H12O6 + 6O2 Carbon dioxide + water ==> glucose + oxygen Green plants need sunlight. They use the light energy to make a sugar called glucose. Glucose can be turned into another type of sugar called sucrose and carried to other parts of the plant in phloem vessels. Glucose can also be turned into starch and stored. Both starch and sucrose can be converted back into glucose and used in respiration. ...read more.

Middle

* Take the temperature of the plant by placing the thermometer into the beaker to see if the elodea is at a temperature where it would not be affected by enzymes . * Count the bubbles at one-minute intervals as they appear using the tally counter to record the results. * Repeat the experiment but moving the bench lamp 5cm away each time after 1 - minute intervals to make it a fair test. Preliminary results: Time in minutes Distance of lamp (cm) Amount of bubbles 1 5 34 2 10 128 3 15 192 4 20 161 5 25 111 Table of results to show how many bubbles were produced per minute at 32? 1. Time in minutes Distance in cm Amount of bubbles produced per minute 1 5 82 2 10 79 3 15 73 4 20 67 5 25 61 6 30 50 7 35 41 8 40 38 2. ...read more.

Conclusion

Anomalous results could of also been caused by my counting at a certain angle that would not allow me to see every single bubble as they rose to the surface or the bubbles could have been caught up in the leaves giving us an underestimate of bubbles produced. Using a tally counter helped to count the amount of bubbles that rose. It was a better method than plotting dots on a piece of paper every time a bubble rose because a dot may be accidentally put on top of another. The graphs showed that the further away the light the less bubbles were produced. To get a better graph or set of results the experiment could have been tested. The results could be like this because the plant could of run out of carbon dioxide. Another error could have been the distance between the light source and elodea were not measured to a high degree of accuracy. Overall I think the experiment went well and although the results varied it turned out ok! 1 ...read more.

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