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Explain the way H20 is absorbed into a root, and the pathways followed by water from roots to leaves in conjunction to the mechanism by which water is transported to the leaves.

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Introduction

Explain the way H20 is absorbed into a root, and the pathways followed by water from roots to leaves in conjunction to the mechanism by which water is transported to the leaves Ali Omar 12th November 2002 Plants like all living things need a healthy dose of oxygen and nutrients in order to survive and keep their parts working. Unlike mammals, plants do not have a pump action system, which transports chemicals around the body; instead plants use another form of transport. ...read more.

Middle

Firstly the water in the soil is received through the root hair cells, whilst the actual root acts as a pillar for the plant helping it to stand upright. The water is then moved across the root into the xylem, this is because of the potential water gradient in the xylem is lower than the potential water gradient in the roots. Once inside the xylem the water has the option to take two different possible roots, the apoplast pathway and the symplast pathway. ...read more.

Conclusion

The symplast pathway is different because it lets the water enter the cytoplasm and move through it, the water reached the cytoplasm via the semi-permeable membrane. Then it moves into the vacuole through the tonoplast. Water within the symplast pathway may move from cell to cell through the plasmodesmata. Once inside the xylem the water begins its journey from the xylem to the stem. The water moves up the stem via xylem vessels going towards the leaves. Then once reached the leaves, the water either evaporates into the leaf air spaces or transpiration occurs where the water vapour is reduced. ...read more.

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